Turner syndrome x ray

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Akash Daswaney, M.B.B.S[2]

Overview

A x-ray may be used to diagnose cardiac and skeletal abnormalities.

X Ray

  • X-ray is helpful in screening/detecting the following cardiac abnormalities: [1][2][3]
    1. [[[Coarctation of aorta]]
    2. Ventricular septal defect
    3. Bicuspid aortic valve
    4. Aortic dissection
    5. Aortal dilation
    6. Aortic aneurysm
    7. Ischemic heart disease
    8. Atherosclerosis
    9. Elongated transverse aortic arch
    10. Pulmonary venous anomalies
    11. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome
    12. Infective endocarditis
  • X-ray is helpful in screening/detecting the following skeletal abnormalities: "Turner Syndrome - StatPearls - NCBI Bookshelf".
    1. Genu valgum
    2. Cubitus valgus deformity
    3. Congenital hip dysplasia
    4. Short 4th metacarpal
    5. Scoliosis
    6. Kyphosis

Images

Hypoyphosis

Scoliosis

Madelung deformity

The features that are evident here are:

Shortened Metacarpals

References

  1. Shankar RK, Backeljauw PF (2018). "Current best practice in the management of Turner syndrome". Ther Adv Endocrinol Metab. 9 (1): 33–40. doi:10.1177/2042018817746291. PMC 5761955. PMID 29344338.
  2. Kesler SR (2007). "Turner syndrome". Child Adolesc Psychiatr Clin N Am. 16 (3): 709–22. doi:10.1016/j.chc.2007.02.004. PMC 2023872. PMID 17562588.
  3. Frías JL, Davenport ML, Committee on Genetics and Section on Endocrinology (2003). "Health supervision for children with Turner syndrome". Pediatrics. 111 (3): 692–702. doi:10.1542/peds.111.3.692. PMID 12612263.


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