Tricuspid regurgitation differential diagnosis

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Fatimo Biobaku M.B.B.S [2]

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Overview

The blowing holosystolic murmur of tricuspid regurgitation must be distinguished from the murmur of mitral regurgitation and a ventricular septal defect.

Differentiating Tricuspid regurgitation from other Diseases

Tricuspid Regurgitation Mitral Regurgitation VSD Constrictive Pericarditis[1]
  • The holosystolic murmur can be best heard over the left third and fourth intercostal spaces and along the sternal border.
  • When the shunt becomes reversed (Eisenmenger's syndrome), the murmur may be absent and S2 can become markedly accentuated and single.
Tricuspid Regurgitation Mitral Regurgitation VSD Constrictive Pericarditis[1]
  • The holosystolic murmur can be best heard over the left third and fourth intercostal spaces and along the sternal border.
  • When the shunt becomes reversed (Eisenmenger's syndrome), the murmur may be absent and S2 can become markedly accentuated and single.

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Ozpelit E, Akdeniz B, Ozpelit ME, Göldeli O (2014). "Severe tricuspid regurgitation mimicking constrictive pericarditis". Am J Case Rep. 15: 271–4. doi:10.12659/AJCR.890092. PMC 4079647. PMID 24995118.



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