Difference between revisions of "Transposition of the great vessels overview"

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*Most patients have an interatrial communication. Two-thirds have a [[patent ductus arteriosus]], and about one-third have a [[ventricular septal defect]].  
 
*Most patients have an interatrial communication. Two-thirds have a [[patent ductus arteriosus]], and about one-third have a [[ventricular septal defect]].  
  
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==Overview==
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==Historical Perspective==
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==Classification==
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==Pathophysiology==
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==Causes==
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== Differentiating Xyz from Other Diseases==
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== Epidemiology and Demographics==
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==Risk Factors==
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==Screening==
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==Natural History, Complications, and Prognosis==
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==Diagnosis==
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===Diagnostic Study of Choice===
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===History and Symptoms===
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===Physical Examination===
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===Laboratory Findings ===
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===Electrocardiogram===
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===X-ray===
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===Echocardiography and Ultrasound===
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===CT scan===
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===MRI===
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===Other Imaging Findings===
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===Other Diagnostic Studies===
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==Treatment==
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===Medical Therapy===
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===Interventions===
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===Surgery ===
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===Primary Prevention===
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===Secondary Prevention===
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==References==
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{{reflist|2}}{{WikiDoc Help Menu}}{{WikiDoc Sources}}
 
==References==
 
==References==
 
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Revision as of 17:17, 19 February 2020

Transposition of the great vessels Microchapters

Home

Patient Information

Overview

Historical perspective

Classification

Dextro-transposition of the great arteries
L-transposition of the great arteries

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Transposition of the great vessels from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Screening

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

Electrocardiogram

Chest X Ray

MRI

CT

Echocardiography

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Surgery

Palliative care
Corrective surgery
Post-operative care
Follow up

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Case #1

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-In-Chief: Priyamvada Singh, M.B.B.S. [2]; Cafer Zorkun, M.D., Ph.D. [3]; Keri Shafer, M.D. [4]; Assistant Editor(s)-In-Chief: Kristin Feeney, B.S. [5]

Overview

It refers to a group of congenital heart defects involving an abnormal spatial arrangement of any of the primary blood vessel:superior vena cava and/or inferior vena cava, pulmonary artery, pulmonary veins, and aorta.

Transposition of the great vessels (TGV)

  • The clinical signs and symptoms associated with TGV may range from a change in blood pressure to an interruption in circulation, depending on the nature and degree of the misplacement and which vessels are involved.
  • The term "TGV" is often used as a more specific reference to transposition of the great arteries TGA; however, TGA only relates to the aorta and the pulmonary artery, whereas TGV is a broader term which can relate to these vessels as well as the SVC, IVC, and pulmonary veins.
  • In its strictest sense, transposition of vessels relates only to defects in which two or more vessels have "swapped" positions; in a broader sense, it may be taken to relate to any defect in which a vessel is in an abnormal position.
  • The terms TGV and TGA are most commonly used in reference to dextro-TGA- in which the arteries are in swapped positions.
  • Both terms are also commonly used, though to a slightly lesser extent, in reference to Levo-Transposition of the great arteries- in which both the arteries and the ventricles are swapped; while other defects in this category are almost never referred to by either of these terms.
  • CHDs involving only the primary arteries (pulmonary artery and aorta) belong to a sub-group called transposition of the great arteries.
  • Most patients have an interatrial communication. Two-thirds have a patent ductus arteriosus, and about one-third have a ventricular septal defect.


Overview

Historical Perspective

Classification

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Xyz from Other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Screening

Natural History, Complications, and Prognosis

Diagnosis

Diagnostic Study of Choice

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

Electrocardiogram

X-ray

Echocardiography and Ultrasound

CT scan

MRI

Other Imaging Findings

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Interventions

Surgery

Primary Prevention

Secondary Prevention

References

References



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