Difference between revisions of "Transposition of the great vessels natural History, complications & prognosis"

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==Prognosis==
 
==Prognosis==
The prognosis on [[simple d-TGA]] depends mainly on the presence of cardiac shunts such as FO, ASD, VSD, and DA. If one or more of these defects are present, blood will be mixed, allowing a small amount of oxygen to be delivered to the body, giving an opportunity to the newborn to survive long enough to receive corrective surgery.  
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* Without treatment, 30% of infants die within the first week of life, 50% will die in the first month, 70% will die in the first 6 months and 90% of infants will die before the end of the first year. The prognosis on [[simple d-TGA]] depends mainly on the presence of cardiac shunts such as FO, ASD, VSD, and DA. If one or more of these defects are present, blood will be mixed, allowing a small amount of oxygen to be delivered to the body, giving an opportunity to the newborn to survive long enough to receive corrective surgery.  
  
 
With '''complex d-TGA''', the infant will fail to thrive and is unlikely to survive longer than a year if corrective surgery is not performed. Generally, if the defect (d-TGA) is not corrected during the first year of life, the patient's condition will deteriorate to the point of inoperability.
 
With '''complex d-TGA''', the infant will fail to thrive and is unlikely to survive longer than a year if corrective surgery is not performed. Generally, if the defect (d-TGA) is not corrected during the first year of life, the patient's condition will deteriorate to the point of inoperability.

Revision as of 17:18, 21 February 2020

Transposition of the great vessels Microchapters

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Overview

Historical perspective

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Dextro-transposition of the great arteries
L-transposition of the great arteries

Pathophysiology

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Differentiating Transposition of the great vessels from other Diseases

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Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-In-Chief: Priyamvada Singh, M.B.B.S. [2]; Cafer Zorkun, M.D., Ph.D. [3]; Keri Shafer, M.D. [4]; Assistant Editor(s)-In-Chief: Kristin Feeney, B.S. [5]

Overview

Natural History

Complications

If patients do not receive treatment, most will die within the first year of life. About 90 percent die within the first year of life

Prognosis

  • Without treatment, 30% of infants die within the first week of life, 50% will die in the first month, 70% will die in the first 6 months and 90% of infants will die before the end of the first year. The prognosis on simple d-TGA depends mainly on the presence of cardiac shunts such as FO, ASD, VSD, and DA. If one or more of these defects are present, blood will be mixed, allowing a small amount of oxygen to be delivered to the body, giving an opportunity to the newborn to survive long enough to receive corrective surgery.

With complex d-TGA, the infant will fail to thrive and is unlikely to survive longer than a year if corrective surgery is not performed. Generally, if the defect (d-TGA) is not corrected during the first year of life, the patient's condition will deteriorate to the point of inoperability.

Modern repair procedures within the ideal timeframe and without additional complications have a very high success rate.

With simple d-TGA, if the foramen ovale and ductus arteriosus are allowed to close naturally, the newborn will likely not survive long enough to receive corrective surgery. With complex d-TGA, the infant will fail to thrive and is unlikely to survive longer than a year if corrective surgery is not performed. In most cases, the patient's condition will deteriorate to the point of inoperability if the defect is not corrected in the first year.

While the foramen ovale and ductus arteriosus are open after birth, some mixing of red and blue blood occurs allowing a small amount of oxygen to be delivered to the body; if ASD, VSD, PFO, and/or PDA are present, this will allow a higher amount of the red and blue blood to be mixed, therefore delivering more oxygen to the body, but can complicate and lengthen the corrective surgery and/or be symptomatic.

Modern repair procedures within the ideal timeframe and without additional complications have a very high success rate.

References




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