Transposition of the great vessels history and symptoms

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Transposition of the great vessels Microchapters

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Overview

Historical perspective

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Dextro-transposition of the great arteries
L-transposition of the great arteries

Pathophysiology

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Differentiating Transposition of the great vessels from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

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Case #1

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-In-Chief: Priyamvada Singh, M.B.B.S. [2]; Cafer Zorkun, M.D., Ph.D. [3]; Keri Shafer, M.D. [4]; Assistant Editor(s)-In-Chief: Kristin Feeney, B.S. [5]

Overview

History

  • Cyanosis can seen soon after the birth, due to the low oxygen saturation of the blood.
  • Peripheral areas such as around the mouth and lips, fingertips, and toes are affected first because they are furthest from the heart, and since the circulated blood is not fully oxygenated to begin with, very little oxygen reaches the peripheral arteries.

Symptoms

  • The bluish discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes is therefore the basic pattern of clinical presentation in transposition.
  • Its onset and severity depend on anatomical and functional variants that influence the degree of mixing between the two circulations.
  • Other non-specific symptoms include:
    • Heart murmurs associated with left outflow tract obstruction, persistent arterial duct or due to a septal defect may be heard, but they are not a constant finding
  • Patients with L-TGA are typically unaffected until later in life when the right ventricle can no longer compensate for the increased afterload of the systemic circulation. These patients present with signs and symptoms of heart failure.

References




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