Difference between revisions of "PiggyBac Transposable Element Derived 5"

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'''PiggyBac Transposable Element Derived 5''' is an [[enzyme]] that in humans is encoded by the ''PGBD5'' [[gene]].<ref>{{cite web|title=PGBD5 piggyBac transposable element derived 5 [Homo sapiens (human)] - Gene - NCBI|url=https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gene/79605|website=www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov|accessdate=8 April 2017}}</ref> PGBD5 is a DNA transposase related to the ancient [[PiggyBac Transposon System|PiggyBac transposase]] first identified in the [[cabbage looper]] moth, ''Trichoplusia ni.''<ref>{{cite journal | vauthors = Toman J | title = A course to pursue | journal = Nursing Times | volume = 75 | issue = 17 | pages = 694–5 | date = April 1979 | pmc = 255260 }}</ref> The gene is believed to have been domesticated over 500 million years ago in the common ancestor of [[cephalochordates]] and [[vertebrates]].<ref name="Pavelitz et al.">{{cite journal | vauthors = Pavelitz T, Gray LT, Padilla SL, Bailey AD, Weiner AM | title = PGBD5: a neural-specific intron-containing piggyBac transposase domesticated over 500 million years ago and conserved from cephalochordates to humans | journal = Mobile DNA | volume = 4 | issue = 1 | pages = 23 | date = November 2013 | pmid = 24180413 | doi = 10.1186/1759-8753-4-23 }}</ref> Although the [[catalytic triad]] of the protein composed of three [[aspartic acid]] residues is not conserved through evolution,<ref name="Pavelitz et al."/> the protein has been shown to be able to transpose DNA in a sequence-specific, cut-and-paste fashion.<ref>{{cite journal | vauthors = Henssen AG, Henaff E, Jiang E, Eisenberg AR, Carson JR, Villasante CM, Ray M, Still E, Burns M, Gandara J, Feschotte C, Mason CE, Kentsis A | title = Genomic DNA transposition induced by human PGBD5 | journal = eLife | volume = 4 | date = September 2015 | pmid = 26406119 | doi = 10.7554/eLife.10565 }}</ref>
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'''PiggyBac Transposable Element Derived 5''' is an [[enzyme]] that in humans is encoded by the ''PGBD5'' [[gene]].<ref>{{cite web|title=PGBD5 piggyBac transposable element derived 5 [Homo sapiens (human)] - Gene - NCBI|url=https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gene/79605|website=www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov|access-date=8 April 2017}}</ref> PGBD5 is a DNA transposase related to the ancient [[PiggyBac Transposon System|PiggyBac transposase]] first identified in the [[cabbage looper]] moth, ''Trichoplusia ni.''<ref>{{cite journal | vauthors = Toman J | title = A course to pursue | journal = Nursing Times | volume = 75 | issue = 17 | pages = 694–5 | date = April 1979 | pmc = 255260 }}</ref> The gene is believed to have been domesticated over 500 million years ago in the common ancestor of [[cephalochordates]] and [[vertebrates]].<ref name="Pavelitz et al.">{{cite journal | vauthors = Pavelitz T, Gray LT, Padilla SL, Bailey AD, Weiner AM | title = PGBD5: a neural-specific intron-containing piggyBac transposase domesticated over 500 million years ago and conserved from cephalochordates to humans | journal = Mobile DNA | volume = 4 | issue = 1 | pages = 23 | date = November 2013 | pmid = 24180413 | doi = 10.1186/1759-8753-4-23 }}</ref> The putative [[catalytic triad]] of the protein composed of three [[aspartic acid]] residues is conserved among PGBD5-like genes through evolution,<ref name=":0" />, and is distinct from other PiggyBac-like genes.<ref name="Pavelitz et al."/> PGBD5 has been shown to be able to transpose DNA in a sequence-specific, cut-and-paste fashion.<ref name=":0">{{cite journal | vauthors = Henssen AG, Henaff E, Jiang E, Eisenberg AR, Carson JR, Villasante CM, Ray M, Still E, Burns M, Gandara J, Feschotte C, Mason CE, Kentsis A | title = Genomic DNA transposition induced by human PGBD5 | journal = eLife | volume = 4 | date = September 2015 | pmid = 26406119 | doi = 10.7554/eLife.10565 }}</ref> PGBD5 has also been proposed to mediate site-specific DNA rearrangements in human tumors.<ref>{{cite journal | vauthors = Henssen AG, Koche R, Zhuang J, Jiang E, Reed C, Eisenberg A, Still E, MacArthur IC, Rodríguez-Fos E, Gonzalez S, Puiggròs M, Blackford AN, Mason CE, de Stanchina E, Gönen M, Emde AK, Shah M, Arora K, Reeves C, Socci ND, Perlman E, Antonescu CR, Roberts CW, Steen H, Mullen E, Jackson SP, Torrents D, Weng Z, Armstrong SA, Kentsis A | title = PGBD5 promotes site-specific oncogenic mutations in human tumors | journal = Nature Genetics | volume = 49 | issue = 7 | pages = 1005–1014 | date = July 2017 | pmid = 28504702 | pmc = 5489359 | doi = 10.1038/ng.3866 }}</ref>
  
 
== References ==
 
== References ==
 
{{reflist}}
 
{{reflist}}
 
  
 
[[Category: Genes on human chromosome 1]]
 
[[Category: Genes on human chromosome 1]]
 
[[Category: Mobile genetic elements]]
 
[[Category: Mobile genetic elements]]
 
[[Category:Enzymes]]
 
[[Category:Enzymes]]

Latest revision as of 14:52, 9 March 2018

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PiggyBac Transposable Element Derived 5 is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the PGBD5 gene.[1] PGBD5 is a DNA transposase related to the ancient PiggyBac transposase first identified in the cabbage looper moth, Trichoplusia ni.[2] The gene is believed to have been domesticated over 500 million years ago in the common ancestor of cephalochordates and vertebrates.[3] The putative catalytic triad of the protein composed of three aspartic acid residues is conserved among PGBD5-like genes through evolution,[4], and is distinct from other PiggyBac-like genes.[3] PGBD5 has been shown to be able to transpose DNA in a sequence-specific, cut-and-paste fashion.[4] PGBD5 has also been proposed to mediate site-specific DNA rearrangements in human tumors.[5]

References

  1. "PGBD5 piggyBac transposable element derived 5 [Homo sapiens (human)] - Gene - NCBI". www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. Retrieved 8 April 2017.
  2. Toman J (April 1979). "A course to pursue". Nursing Times. 75 (17): 694–5. PMC 255260.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Pavelitz T, Gray LT, Padilla SL, Bailey AD, Weiner AM (November 2013). "PGBD5: a neural-specific intron-containing piggyBac transposase domesticated over 500 million years ago and conserved from cephalochordates to humans". Mobile DNA. 4 (1): 23. doi:10.1186/1759-8753-4-23. PMID 24180413.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Henssen AG, Henaff E, Jiang E, Eisenberg AR, Carson JR, Villasante CM, Ray M, Still E, Burns M, Gandara J, Feschotte C, Mason CE, Kentsis A (September 2015). "Genomic DNA transposition induced by human PGBD5". eLife. 4. doi:10.7554/eLife.10565. PMID 26406119.
  5. Henssen AG, Koche R, Zhuang J, Jiang E, Reed C, Eisenberg A, Still E, MacArthur IC, Rodríguez-Fos E, Gonzalez S, Puiggròs M, Blackford AN, Mason CE, de Stanchina E, Gönen M, Emde AK, Shah M, Arora K, Reeves C, Socci ND, Perlman E, Antonescu CR, Roberts CW, Steen H, Mullen E, Jackson SP, Torrents D, Weng Z, Armstrong SA, Kentsis A (July 2017). "PGBD5 promotes site-specific oncogenic mutations in human tumors". Nature Genetics. 49 (7): 1005–1014. doi:10.1038/ng.3866. PMC 5489359. PMID 28504702.

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