Neurocognitive

Revision as of 01:26, 24 May 2008 by Jackbot (talk | contribs) (Robot: Automated text replacement (-(?ms)^(.*)$ +\1 {{WikiDoc Sources}}))
(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)
Jump to: navigation, search
Neuropsychology
 
Topics

Brain-computer interfacesBrain damage
Brain regionsClinical neuropsychology
Cognitive neuroscienceHuman brain
NeuroanatomyNeurophysiology
PhrenologyCommon misconceptions

Brain functions

arousalattention
consciousnessdecision making
executive functionslanguage
learningmemory
motor coordinationperception
planningproblem solving
thought

People

Arthur L. Benton • David Bohm •
António Damásio • Kenneth Heilman •
Phineas Gage • Norman Geschwind •
Elkhonon Goldberg • Donald Hebb •
Alexander Luria • Muriel D. Lezak •
Brenda Milner • Karl Pribram •
Oliver Sacks • Roger Sperry• H.M.• K.C.

Tests

Bender-Gestalt Test
Benton Visual Retention Test
Clinical Dementia Rating
Continuous Performance Task
Glasgow Coma Scale
Hayling and Brixton tests
Lexical decision task
Mini-mental state examination
Stroop effect
Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale
Wisconsin card sorting task

Tools

Johari Window

Mind and Brain Portal
This box: view  talk  edit

Neurocognitive is a term used to describe cognitive functions closely linked to the function of particular areas, neural pathways, or cortical networks in the brain. Therefore, their understanding is closely linked to the practice of neuropsychology and cognitive neuroscience, two disciplines that broadly seek to understand how the structure and function of the brain relates to thought and behaviour.

A neurocognitive deficit is a reduction or impairment of cognitive function in one of these areas, but particularly when physical changes can be seen to have occurred in the brain, such as after neurological illness, mental illness, drug use, or brain injury.

A clinical neuropsychologist may specialise in using neuropsychological tests to detect and understand such deficits, and may be involved in the rehabilitation of an affected person. The discipline that studies neurocognitive deficits to infer normal psychological function is called cognitive neuropsychology.

See also

References

  • Green, K. J. (1998). Schizophrenia from a Neurocognitive Perspective. Boston, Allyn and Bacon.

Linked-in.jpg