Golimumab

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Golimumab
Black Box Warning
Adult Indications & Dosage
Pediatric Indications & Dosage
Contraindications
Warnings & Precautions
Adverse Reactions
Drug Interactions
Use in Specific Populations
Administration & Monitoring
Overdosage
Pharmacology
Clinical Studies
How Supplied
Images
Patient Counseling Information
Precautions with Alcohol
Brand Names
Look-Alike Names

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Gloria Picoy [2]

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Black Box Warning

WARNING: SERIOUS INFECTIONS AND MALIGNANCY
See full prescribing information for complete Boxed Warning.
====Serious infections====

Patients treated with SIMPONI® are at increased risk for developing serious infections that may lead to hospitalization or death. Most patients who developed these infections were taking concomitant immunosuppressants such as methotrexate or corticosteroids.

Discontinue SIMPONI if a patient develops a serious infection.

Reported infections with TNF-blockers, of which SIMPONI is a member, include:

  • Active tuberculosis, including reactivation of latent tuberculosis. Patients with tuberculosis have frequently presented with disseminated or extrapulmonary disease. Test patients for latent tuberculosis before SIMPONI use and during therapy. Initiate treatment for latent TB prior to SIMPONI use.
  • Invasive fungal infections including histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, candidiasis, aspergillosis, blastomycosis and pneumocystosis. Patients with histoplasmosis or other invasive fungal infections may present with disseminated, rather than localized, disease. Antigen and antibody testing for histoplasmosis may be negative in some patients with active infection. Consider empiric anti-fungal therapy in patients at risk for invasive fungal infections who develop severe systemic illness.
  • Bacterial, viral and other infections due to opportunistic pathogens, including Legionella and Listeria.

Consider the risks and benefits of treatment with SIMPONI prior to initiating therapy in patients with chronic or recurrent infection.

Monitor patients closely for the development of signs and symptoms of infection during and after treatment with SIMPONI, including the possible development of tuberculosis in patients who tested negative for latent tuberculosis infection prior to initiating therapy.

Malignancy

Lymphoma and other malignancies, some fatal, have been reported in children and adolescent patients treated with TNF blockers, of which SIMPONI is a member.

Overview

Golimumab is a tumor necrosis factor inhibitor that is FDA approved for the treatment of moderately to severely active rheumatoid arthritis (RA), active psoriatic arthritis (PsA), active ankylosing spondylitis (AS); and moderate to severe Ulcerative colitis (UC) with an inadequate response or intolerant to prior treatment or requiring continuous steroid therapy. There is a Black Box Warning for this drug as shown here. Common adverse reactions include {{{adverseReactions}}}.

Adult Indications and Dosage

FDA-Labeled Indications and Dosage (Adult)

Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Golimumab, in combination with methotrexate, is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with moderately to severely active rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Dosage: 50 mg administered by subcutaneous injection once a month
Psoriatic Arthritis
  • Golimumab, alone or in combination with methotrexate, is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with active psoriatic arthritis.
  • Dosage: 50 mg administered by subcutaneous injection once a month
Ankylosing Spondylitis
  • Golimumab is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with active ankylosing spondylitis.
  • Dosage: 50 mg administered by subcutaneous injection once a month
Ulcerative Colitis
  • Golimumab is indicated in adult patients with moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis who have demonstrated corticosteroid dependence or who have had an inadequate response to or failed to tolerate oral aminosalicylates, oral corticosteroids, azathioprine, or 6-mercaptopurine for:
  • inducing and maintaining clinical response
  • improving endoscopic appearance of the mucosa during induction
  • inducing clinical remission
  • achieving and sustaining clinical remission in induction responders
  • Dosage: 200 mg subcutaneous injection at Week 0, followed by 100 mg at Week 2 and then maintenance therapy with 100 mg every 4 weeks.

Off-Label Use and Dosage (Adult)

Guideline-Supported Use

There is limited information regarding Off-Label Guideline-Supported Use of Golimumab in adult patients.

Non–Guideline-Supported Use

There is limited information regarding Off-Label Non–Guideline-Supported Use of Golimumab in adult patients.

Pediatric Indications and Dosage

FDA-Labeled Indications and Dosage (Pediatric)

Safety and effectiveness of golimumab have not been established in pediatric patients younger than 18 years

Off-Label Use and Dosage (Pediatric)

Guideline-Supported Use

There is limited information regarding Off-Label Guideline-Supported Use of Golimumab in pediatric patients.

Non–Guideline-Supported Use

There is limited information regarding Off-Label Non–Guideline-Supported Use of Golimumab in pediatric patients.

Contraindications

None

Warnings

WARNING: SERIOUS INFECTIONS AND MALIGNANCY
See full prescribing information for complete Boxed Warning.
====Serious infections====

Patients treated with SIMPONI® are at increased risk for developing serious infections that may lead to hospitalization or death. Most patients who developed these infections were taking concomitant immunosuppressants such as methotrexate or corticosteroids.

Discontinue SIMPONI if a patient develops a serious infection.

Reported infections with TNF-blockers, of which SIMPONI is a member, include:

  • Active tuberculosis, including reactivation of latent tuberculosis. Patients with tuberculosis have frequently presented with disseminated or extrapulmonary disease. Test patients for latent tuberculosis before SIMPONI use and during therapy. Initiate treatment for latent TB prior to SIMPONI use.
  • Invasive fungal infections including histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, candidiasis, aspergillosis, blastomycosis and pneumocystosis. Patients with histoplasmosis or other invasive fungal infections may present with disseminated, rather than localized, disease. Antigen and antibody testing for histoplasmosis may be negative in some patients with active infection. Consider empiric anti-fungal therapy in patients at risk for invasive fungal infections who develop severe systemic illness.
  • Bacterial, viral and other infections due to opportunistic pathogens, including Legionella and Listeria.

Consider the risks and benefits of treatment with SIMPONI prior to initiating therapy in patients with chronic or recurrent infection.

Monitor patients closely for the development of signs and symptoms of infection during and after treatment with SIMPONI, including the possible development of tuberculosis in patients who tested negative for latent tuberculosis infection prior to initiating therapy.

Malignancy

Lymphoma and other malignancies, some fatal, have been reported in children and adolescent patients treated with TNF blockers, of which SIMPONI is a member.

Serious Infections

Patients treated with SIMPONI are at increased risk for developing serious infections involving various organ systems and sites that may lead to hospitalization or death.

Opportunistic infections due to bacterial, mycobacterial, invasive fungal, viral, or parasitic organisms including aspergillosis, blastomycosis, candidiasis, coccidioidomycosis, histoplasmosis, legionellosis, listeriosis, pneumocystosis, and tuberculosis have been reported with TNF-blockers. Patients have frequently presented with disseminated rather than localized disease. The concomitant use of a TNF-blocker and abatacept or anakinra was associated with a higher risk of serious infections; therefore, the concomitant use of SIMPONI and these biologic products is not recommended [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.5, 5.6) and DRUG INTERACTIONS (7.2)].

Treatment with SIMPONI should not be initiated in patients with an active infection, including clinically important localized infections. Patients greater than 65 years of age, patients with co-morbid conditions and/or patients taking concomitant immunosuppressants such as corticosteroids or methotrexate may be at greater risk of infection. Consider the risks and benefits of treatment prior to initiating SIMPONI in patients:

  • with chronic or recurrent infection;
  • who have been exposed to tuberculosis;
  • with a history of an opportunistic infection;
  • who have resided or traveled in areas of endemic tuberculosis or endemic mycoses, such as histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, or blastomycosis; or
  • with underlying conditions that may predispose them to infection.
Serious Infection in Clinical Trials

In controlled Phase 3 trials through Week 16 in patients with RA, PsA, and AS, serious infections were observed in 1.4% of SIMPONI-treated patients and 1.3% of control-treated patients. In the controlled Phase 3 trials through Week 16 in patients with RA, PsA, and AS, the incidence of serious infections per 100 patient-years of follow-up was 5.7 (95% CI: 3.8, 8.2) for the SIMPONI group and 4.2 (95% CI: 1.8, 8.2) for the placebo group. In the controlled Phase 2/3 trial through Week 6 of SIMPONI induction in UC, the incidence of serious infections in SIMPONI 200/100 mg-treated patients was similar to the incidence of serious infections in placebo-treated patients. Through Week 60, the incidence of serious infections was similar in patients who received SIMPONI induction and 100 mg during maintenance compared with patients who received SIMPONI induction and placebo during the maintenance portion of the UC trial. Serious infections observed in SIMPONI-treated patients included sepsis, pneumonia, cellulitis, abscess, tuberculosis, invasive fungal infections, and hepatitis B infection.

Tuberculosis

Cases of reactivation of tuberculosis or new tuberculosis infections have been observed in patients receiving TNF-blockers, including patients who have previously received treatment for latent or active tuberculosis. Evaluate patients for tuberculosis risk factors and test for latent infection prior to initiating SIMPONI and periodically during therapy.

Treatment of latent tuberculosis infection prior to therapy with TNF-blockers has been shown to reduce the risk of tuberculosis reactivation during therapy. Prior to initiating SIMPONI, assess if treatment for latent tuberculosis is needed; an induration of 5 mm or greater is a positive tuberculin skin test, even for patients previously vaccinated with Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG).

Consider anti-tuberculosis therapy prior to initiation of SIMPONI in patients with a past history of latent or active tuberculosis in whom an adequate course of treatment cannot be confirmed, and for patients with a negative test for latent tuberculosis but having risk factors for tuberculosis infection. Consultation with a physician with expertise in the treatment of tuberculosis is recommended to aid in the decision whether initiating anti-tuberculosis therapy is appropriate for an individual patient.

Cases of active tuberculosis have occurred in patients treated with SIMPONI during and after treatment for latent tuberculosis. Monitor patients for the development of signs and symptoms of tuberculosis including patients who tested negative for latent tuberculosis infection prior to initiating therapy, patients who are on treatment for latent tuberculosis, or patients who were previously treated for tuberculosis infection.

Consider tuberculosis in the differential diagnosis in patients who develop a new infection during SIMPONI treatment, especially in patients who have previously or recently traveled to countries with a high prevalence of tuberculosis, or who have had close contact with a person with active tuberculosis.

In the controlled and uncontrolled portions of the Phase 2 RA and Phase 3 RA, PsA, and AS trials, the incidence of active TB was 0.23 and 0 per 100 patient-years in 2347 SIMPONI-treated patients and 674 placebo-treated patients, respectively. Cases of TB included pulmonary and extra pulmonary TB. The overwhelming majority of the TB cases occurred in countries with a high incidence rate of TB. In the controlled Phase 2/3 trial of SIMPONI induction through Week 6 in UC, no cases of TB were observed in SIMPONI 200/100 mg-treated patients or in placebo-treated patients. Through Week 60, the incidence per 100 patient-years of TB in patients who received SIMPONI induction and 100 mg during the maintenance portion of the UC trial was 0.52 (95% CI: 0.11, 1.53). One case of TB was observed in the placebo maintenance group in a patient who received SIMPONI intravenous (IV) induction.

Invasive Fungal Infections

If patients develop a serious systemic illness and they reside or travel in regions where mycoses are endemic, consider invasive fungal infection in the differential diagnosis. Consider appropriate empiric antifungal therapy and take into account both the risk for severe fungal infection and the risks of antifungal therapy while a diagnostic workup is being performed. Antigen and antibody testing for histoplasmosis may be negative in some patients with active infection. To aid in the management of such patients, consider consultation with a physician with expertise in the diagnosis and treatment of invasive fungal infections.

Hepatitis B Virus Reactivation

The use of TNF-blockers including SIMPONI has been associated with reactivation of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in patients who are chronic hepatitis B carriers (i.e., surface antigen positive). In some instances, HBV reactivation occurring in conjunction with TNF-blocker therapy has been fatal. The majority of these reports have occurred in patients who received concomitant immunosuppressants.

All patients should be tested for HBV infection before initiating TNF-blocker therapy. For patients who test positive for hepatitis B surface antigen, consultation with a physician with expertise in the treatment of hepatitis B is recommended before initiating TNF-blocker therapy. The risks and benefits of treatment should be considered prior to prescribing TNF-blockers, including SIMPONI, to patients who are carriers of HBV. Adequate data are not available on whether anti-viral therapy can reduce the risk of HBV reactivation in HBV carriers who are treated with TNF-blockers. Patients who are carriers of HBV and require treatment with TNF-blockers should be closely monitored for clinical and laboratory signs of active HBV infection throughout therapy and for several months following termination of therapy.

In patients who develop HBV reactivation, TNF-blockers should be stopped and antiviral therapy with appropriate supportive treatment should be initiated. The safety of resuming TNF-blockers after HBV reactivation has been controlled is not known. Therefore, prescribers should exercise caution when considering resumption of TNF-blockers in this situation and monitor patients closely.

Malignancies

Malignancies, some fatal, have been reported among children, adolescents, and young adults who received treatment with TNF-blocking agents (initiation of therapy ≤ 18 years of age), of which SIMPONI is a member. Approximately half the cases were lymphomas, including Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The other cases represented a variety of malignancies, including rare malignancies that are usually associated with immunosuppression, and malignancies that are not usually observed in children and adolescents. The malignancies occurred after a median of 30 months (range 1 to 84 months) after the first dose of TNF blocker therapy. Most of the patients were receiving concomitant immunosuppressants. These cases were reported post-marketing and are derived from a variety of sources, including registries and spontaneous postmarketing reports.

The risks and benefits of TNF-blocker treatment including SIMPONI should be considered prior to initiating therapy in patients with a known malignancy other than a successfully treated non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) or when considering continuing a TNF-blocker in patients who develop a malignancy.

In the controlled portions of clinical trials of TNF-blockers including SIMPONI, more cases of lymphoma have been observed among patients receiving anti-TNF treatment compared with patients in the control groups. During the controlled portions of the Phase 2 trials in RA, and the Phase 3 trials in RA, PsA and AS, the incidence of lymphoma per 100 patient-years of follow-up was 0.21 (95% CI: 0.03, 0.77) in the combined SIMPONI group compared with an incidence of 0 (95% CI: 0., 0.96) in the placebo group. In the controlled and uncontrolled portions of these clinical trials in 2347 SIMPONI-treated patients with a median follow-up of 1.4 years, the incidence of lymphoma was 3.8-fold higher than expected in the general U.S. population according to the SEER database (adjusted for age, gender, and race).1 Through Week 60 of the UC trials, there were no cases of lymphoma with SIMPONI. Patients with RA and other chronic inflammatory diseases, particularly patients with highly active disease and/or chronic exposure to immunosuppressant therapies, may be at higher risk (up to several fold) than the general population for the development of lymphoma, even in the absence of TNF-blocking therapy. Cases of acute and chronic leukemia have been reported with postmarketing TNF-blocker use in rheumatoid arthritis and other indications. Even in the absence of TNF blocker therapy, patients with rheumatoid arthritis may be at a higher risk (approximately 2-fold) than the general population for the development of leukemia.

Rare post-marketing cases of hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma (HSTCL) have been reported in patients treated with TNF-blocking agents. This rare type of T-cell lymphoma has a very aggressive disease course and is usually fatal. Nearly all of the reported TNF-blocker associated cases have occurred in patients with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. The majority were in adolescent and young adult males. Almost all these patients had received treatment with azathioprine (AZA) or 6-mercaptopurine (6–MP) concomitantly with a TNF blocker at or prior to diagnosis. The potential risk with the combination of AZA or 6-MP and SIMPONI should be carefully considered. A risk for the development for hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma in patients treated with TNF-blockers cannot be excluded.

During the controlled portions of the Phase 2 trial in RA, and the Phase 3 trials in RA, PsA and AS, the incidence of malignancies other than lymphoma per 100 patient-years of follow-up was not elevated in the combined SIMPONI group compared with the placebo group. In the controlled and uncontrolled portions of these trials, the incidence of malignancies, other than lymphoma, in SIMPONI-treated patients was similar to that expected in the general U.S. population according to the SEER database (adjusted for age, gender, and race).1 In the 6-week placebo-controlled portions of the SIMPONI Phase 2/3 clinical trials in UC, the incidence of non-lymphoma malignancies (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer) was similar between the SIMPONI and the placebo group. Through Week 60, the incidence of non-lymphoma malignancies (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer) was similar to the general U.S. population according to the SEER database (adjusted for age, gender, and race).1 Short follow-up periods, such as those of one year or less in the studies above, may not adequately reflect the true incidence of malignancies.

It is not known if SIMPONI treatment influences the risk for developing dysplasia or colon cancer. All patients with ulcerative colitis who are at increased risk for dysplasia or colon carcinoma (for example, patients with long-standing ulcerative colitis or primary sclerosing cholangitis), or who had a prior history of dysplasia or colon carcinoma should be screened for dysplasia at regular intervals before therapy and throughout their disease course. This evaluation should include colonoscopy and biopsies per local recommendations. In patients with newly diagnosed dysplasia treated with SIMPONI, the risks and benefits to the individual patient must be carefully reviewed and consideration should be given to whether therapy should be continued.

Melanoma has been reported in patients treated with TNF-blocking agents, including SIMPONI. Merkel cell carcinoma has been reported in patients treated with TNF-blocking agents. Periodic skin examination is recommended for all patients, particularly those with risk factors for skin cancer.

In controlled trials of other TNF-blockers in patients at higher risk for malignancies (e.g., patients with COPD, patients with Wegener's granulomatosis treated with concomitant cyclophosphamide) a greater portion of malignancies occurred in the TNF-blocker group compared to the controlled group. In an exploratory 1-year clinical trial evaluating the use of 50, 100 and 200 mg of SIMPONI in 309 patients with severe persistent asthma, 6 patients developed malignancies other than NMSC in the SIMPONI groups compared to none in the control group. Three of the 6 patients were in the 200 mg SIMPONI group.

Congestive Heart Failure

Cases of worsening congestive heart failure (CHF) and new onset CHF have been reported with TNF-blockers, including SIMPONI. In several exploratory trials of other TNF-blockers in the treatment of CHF, there were greater proportions of TNF-blocker treated patients who had CHF exacerbations requiring hospitalization or increased mortality. SIMPONI has not been studied in patients with a history of CHF and SIMPONI should be used with caution in patients with CHF. If a decision is made to administer SIMPONI to patients with CHF, these patients should be closely monitored during therapy, and SIMPONI should be discontinued if new or worsening symptoms of CHF appear.

Demyelinating Disorders

Use of TNF-blockers, of which SIMPONI is a member, has been associated with rare cases of new onset or exacerbation of central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating disorders, including multiple sclerosis (MS) and peripheral demyelinating disorders, including Guillain-Barré syndrome. Cases of central demyelination, MS, optic neuritis, and peripheral demyelinating polyneuropathy have rarely been reported in patients treated with SIMPONI. Prescribers should exercise caution in considering the use of TNF-blockers, including SIMPONI, in patients with central or peripheral nervous system demyelinating disorders. Discontinuation of SIMPONI should be considered if these disorders develop.

Use with Abatacept

In controlled trials, the concurrent administration of another TNF-blocker and abatacept was associated with a greater proportion of serious infections than the use of a TNF-blocker alone; and the combination therapy, compared to the use of a TNF-blocker alone, has not demonstrated improved clinical benefit in the treatment of RA. Therefore, the combination of TNF-blockers including SIMPONI and abatacept is not recommended.

Use with Anakinra

Concurrent administration of anakinra (an interleukin-1 antagonist) and another TNF-blocker, was associated with a greater portion of serious infections and neutropenia and no additional benefits compared with the TNF-blocker alone. Therefore, the combination of anakinra with TNF-blockers, including SIMPONI, is not recommended.

Switching Between Biological Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs

Care should be taken when switching from one biological product to another biological product since overlapping biological activity may further increase the risk of infection.

Hematologic Cytopenias

There have been post-marketing reports of pancytopenia, leukopenia, neutropenia, aplastic anemia, and thrombocytopenia in patients receiving TNF-blockers. In clinical trials, cases of pancytopenia, leukopenia, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia have also occurred in SIMPONI-treated patients. Caution should be exercised when using TNF-blockers, including SIMPONI, in patients who have or have had significant cytopenias.

Vaccinations/Therapeutic Infectious Agents

Live Vaccines

Patients treated with SIMPONI may receive vaccinations, except for live vaccines. In patients receiving anti-TNF therapy, limited data are available on the response to live vaccination, or on the secondary transmission of infection by live vaccines. Use of live vaccines could result in clinical infections, including disseminated infections.

Therapeutic Infectious Agents

Other uses of therapeutic infectious agents such as live attenuated bacteria (e.g., BCG bladder instillation for the treatment of cancer) could result in clinical infections, including disseminated infections. It is recommended that therapeutic infectious agents not be given concurrently with SIMPONI.

Non-live Vaccines

In the Phase 3 PsA trial, after pneumococcal vaccination, a similar proportion of SIMPONI-treated and placebo-treated patients were able to mount an adequate immune response of at least a 2-fold increase in antibody titers to pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine. In both SIMPONI-treated and placebo-treated patients, the proportions of patients with response to pneumococcal vaccine were lower among patients receiving MTX compared with patients not receiving MTX. The data suggest that SIMPONI does not suppress the humoral immune response to the pneumococcal vaccine.

Hypersensitivity Reactions

In post-marketing experience, serious systemic hypersensitivity reactions (including anaphylactic reaction) have been reported following SIMPONI administration. Some of these reactions occurred after the first administration of SIMPONI. If an anaphylactic or other serious allergic reaction occurs, administration of SIMPONI should be discontinued immediately and appropriate therapy instituted.

Adverse Reactions

Clinical Trials Experience

There is limited information regarding Golimumab Clinical Trials Experience in the drug label.

Postmarketing Experience

The following adverse reactions have been identified during post-approval use of SIMPONI. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to SIMPONI exposure.

  • Immune System Disorders: Serious systemic hypersensitivity reactions (including anaphylactic reaction), sarcoidosis
  • Neoplasms benign, malignant and unspecified: Melanoma
  • Respiratory, thoracic and mediastinal disorders: Interstitial lung disease
  • Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders: Skin exfoliation, rash, bullous skin reactions

Drug Interactions

Methotrexate

For the treatment of RA, SIMPONI should be used with methotrexate (MTX). Since the presence or absence of concomitant MTX did not appear to influence the efficacy or safety of SIMPONI in the treatment of PsA or AS, SIMPONI can be used with or without MTX in the treatment of PsA and AS.

Biological Products for RA, PsA, and/or AS

An increased risk of serious infections has been seen in clinical RA trials of other TNF-blockers used in combination with anakinra or abatacept, with no added benefit; therefore, use of SIMPONI with abatacept or anakinra is not recommended. A higher rate of serious infections has also been observed in RA patients treated with rituximab who received subsequent treatment with a TNF-blocker. The concomitant use of SIMPONI with biologics approved to treat RA, PsA, or AS is not recommended because of the possibility of an increased risk of infection.

Live Vaccines/Therapeutic Infectious Agents

Live vaccines should not be given concurrently with SIMPONI. Therapeutic infectious agents should not be given concurrently with SIMPONI. Infants born to women treated with SIMPONI during their pregnancy may be at increased risk of infection for up to 6 months. Administration of live vaccines to infants exposed to SIMPONI in utero is not recommended for 6 months following the mother's last SIMPONI injection during pregnancy.

Cytochrome P450 Substrates

The formation of CYP450 enzymes may be suppressed by increased levels of cytokines (e.g., TNFα) during chronic inflammation. Therefore, it is expected that for a molecule that antagonizes cytokine activity, such as golimumab, the formation of CYP450 enzymes could be normalized. Upon initiation or discontinuation of SIMPONI in patients being treated with CYP450 substrates with a narrow therapeutic index, monitoring of the effect (e.g., warfarin) or drug concentration (e.g., cyclosporine or theophylline) is recommended and the individual dose of the drug product may be adjusted as needed.

Use in Specific Populations

Pregnancy

Pregnancy Category (FDA): There is no FDA guidance on usage of Golimumab in women who are pregnant.
Pregnancy Category (AUS): There is no Australian Drug Evaluation Committee (ADEC) guidance on usage of Golimumab in women who are pregnant.

Labor and Delivery

There is no FDA guidance on use of Golimumab during labor and delivery.

Nursing Mothers

There is no FDA guidance on the use of Golimumab in women who are nursing.

Pediatric Use

There is no FDA guidance on the use of Golimumab in pediatric settings.

Geriatic Use

There is no FDA guidance on the use of Golimumab in geriatric settings.

Gender

There is no FDA guidance on the use of Golimumab with respect to specific gender populations.

Race

There is no FDA guidance on the use of Golimumab with respect to specific racial populations.

Renal Impairment

There is no FDA guidance on the use of Golimumab in patients with renal impairment.

Hepatic Impairment

There is no FDA guidance on the use of Golimumab in patients with hepatic impairment.

Females of Reproductive Potential and Males

There is no FDA guidance on the use of Golimumab in women of reproductive potentials and males.

Immunocompromised Patients

There is no FDA guidance one the use of Golimumab in patients who are immunocompromised.

Administration and Monitoring

Administration

There is limited information regarding Golimumab Administration in the drug label.

Monitoring

Closely monitor patients for the development of signs and symptoms of infection during and after treatment with SIMPONI. Discontinue SIMPONI if a patient develops a serious infection, an opportunistic infection, or sepsis. For a patient who develops a new infection during treatment with SIMPONI, perform a prompt and complete diagnostic workup appropriate for an immunocompromised patient, initiate appropriate antimicrobial therapy and closely monitor them.

IV Compatibility

There is limited information regarding the compatibility of Golimumab and IV administrations.

Overdosage

There is limited information regarding Golimumab overdosage. If you suspect drug poisoning or overdose, please contact the National Poison Help hotline (1-800-222-1222) immediately.

Pharmacology

There is limited information regarding Golimumab Pharmacology in the drug label.

Mechanism of Action

There is limited information regarding Golimumab Mechanism of Action in the drug label.

Structure

There is limited information regarding Golimumab Structure in the drug label.

Pharmacodynamics

There is limited information regarding Golimumab Pharmacodynamics in the drug label.

Pharmacokinetics

There is limited information regarding Golimumab Pharmacokinetics in the drug label.

Nonclinical Toxicology

There is limited information regarding Golimumab Nonclinical Toxicology in the drug label.

Clinical Studies

There is limited information regarding Golimumab Clinical Studies in the drug label.

How Supplied

There is limited information regarding Golimumab How Supplied in the drug label.

Storage

There is limited information regarding Golimumab Storage in the drug label.

Images

Drug Images

Package and Label Display Panel

Golimumab 50 mg-0.5 ml.png
This image of the FDA label is provided by the National Library of Medicine.
Golimumab 100 mg-ml.png
This image of the FDA label is provided by the National Library of Medicine.

Patient Counseling Information

There is limited information regarding Golimumab Patient Counseling Information in the drug label.

Precautions with Alcohol

Alcohol-Golimumab interaction has not been established. Talk to your doctor about the effects of taking alcohol with this medication.

Brand Names

There is limited information regarding Golimumab Brand Names in the drug label.

Look-Alike Drug Names

There is limited information regarding Golimumab Look-Alike Drug Names in the drug label.

Drug Shortage Status

Price

References

The contents of this FDA label are provided by the National Library of Medicine.

Golimumab
Monoclonal antibody
Type?
SourceTemplate:Infobox drug/mab source
TargetTNFα
Identifiers
CAS Number
E number{{#property:P628}}
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Chemical and physical data
FormulaC6530H10068N1752O2026S44
Molar mass146,945.25 g·mol−1

Golimumab is a human monoclonal antibody which is used as an immunosuppressive drug. Golimumab targets tumor necrosis factor alpha, a pro-inflammatory molecule.


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