Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome history and symptoms

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Raviteja Guddeti, M.B.B.S. [2]

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Symptoms

The most common symptom experienced by patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is palpitations. The frequency of occurrence of palpitations depends on the patients.[1]

Other symptoms experienced by these patients include:

The most common arrhythmias associated with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome AV reentry tachycardias and presents as a paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia. WPW syndrome, uncommonly presents as cardiac arrest and SCD, though is very rare, some patient's first presentation can be as SCD.[2][3][4]

The accessory pathway of WPW syndrome is present since birth. But the age of presentation varies from patient to patient. Infants can develop heart failure if not treated immediately. Symptoms of WPW syndrome in infants include:

Wolf-Parkinson-White pattern is a condition where in the patient has an accessory bundle of conduction in his heart but with no symptoms. The condition is an accidental finding in a patient who is undergoing cardiac check up for some other reason.

References

  1. "http://anesthesia.ucsf.edu/shapiro/svt_Mayo_2008.pdf" (PDF). Retrieved 14 April 2014. External link in |title= (help)
  2. Pediatric and Congenital Electrophysiology Society (PACES). Heart Rhythm Society (HRS). American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF). American Heart Association (AHA). American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). Canadian Heart Rhythm Society (CHRS); et al. (2012). "PACES/HRS expert consensus statement on the management of the asymptomatic young patient with a Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW, ventricular preexcitation) electrocardiographic pattern: developed in partnership between the Pediatric and Congenital Electrophysiology Society (PACES) and the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS). Endorsed by the governing bodies of PACES, HRS, the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), the American Heart Association (AHA), the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), and the Canadian Heart Rhythm Society (CHRS)". Heart Rhythm. 9 (6): 1006–24. doi:10.1016/j.hrthm.2012.03.050. PMID 22579340.
  3. Obeyesekere, MN.; Leong-Sit, P.; Massel, D.; Manlucu, J.; Modi, S.; Krahn, AD.; Skanes, AC.; Yee, R.; Gula, LJ. (2012). "Risk of arrhythmia and sudden death in patients with asymptomatic preexcitation: a meta-analysis". Circulation. 125 (19): 2308–15. doi:10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.111.055350. PMID 22532593. Unknown parameter |month= ignored (help)
  4. Obeyesekere MN, Leong-Sit P, Massel D, Manlucu J, Modi S, Krahn AD; et al. (2012). "Risk of arrhythmia and sudden death in patients with asymptomatic preexcitation: a meta-analysis". Circulation. 125 (19): 2308–15. doi:10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.111.055350. PMID 22532593.



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