Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome epidemiology and demographics

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Cafer Zorkun, M.D., Ph.D. [2]

Epidemiology and Demographics

  • Estimated prevalence of WPW syndrome is 1 - 3 per 1000 people in the entire world.[1]
  • Prevalence increases in first degree relatives in which it can get as high as 5-6 per 1000 people.[1]
  • The incidence of tachyarrhythmias is not well established in patients who present WPW pattern. It has been reported that the incidence of tachyarrhytmias is approximately 1% per year in patients with WPW pattern.[2]
  • The incidence of sudden cardiac death in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White pattern is not high. A serious of studies have been performed and found a that this events appear in a range of 0.7 tp 4.5 per 1000 patient-years.[1][3][4]
  • Incidence of WPW is higher in men than in women in a ratio of approximately 2:1. Also, atrial fibrillation and ventricular fibrillation are more common in men than in women with WPW.[5]
  • Incidence of Orthodromic AVRT is more common in women than in men.[6]
  • The presentation of symptoms in patients without heart structural abnormalities has been found to be age dependent.[1]
  • The frequency of Supraventricular tachycardias (SVT) usually decrease during the first year in more than 90% of the patients.[1]
  • In 30% of the patients, tachycardias recur during childhood at a mean age of 7 to 8 years of age.[1]
  • When patients with WPW present persistent symptomatic tachycardias over 5 years of age, they usually continue presenting SVT episodes for more than a decade later in 75% of the cases.[1]
  • The occurrence of atrial fibrillation in patients with WPW ha been estimated in between 10% to 30%.[7][8]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 Pediatric and Congenital Electrophysiology Society (PACES). Heart Rhythm Society (HRS). American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF). American Heart Association (AHA). American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). Canadian Heart Rhythm Society (CHRS); et al. (2012). "PACES/HRS expert consensus statement on the management of the asymptomatic young patient with a Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW, ventricular preexcitation) electrocardiographic pattern: developed in partnership between the Pediatric and Congenital Electrophysiology Society (PACES) and the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS). Endorsed by the governing bodies of PACES, HRS, the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), the American Heart Association (AHA), the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), and the Canadian Heart Rhythm Society (CHRS)". Heart Rhythm. 9 (6): 1006–24. doi:10.1016/j.hrthm.2012.03.050. PMID 22579340.
  2. Fitzsimmons, PJ.; McWhirter, PD.; Peterson, DW.; Kruyer, WB. (2001). "The natural history of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome in 228 military aviators: a long-term follow-up of 22 years". Am Heart J. 142 (3): 530–6. doi:10.1067/mhj.2001.117779. PMID 11526369. Unknown parameter |month= ignored (help)
  3. Obeyesekere, MN.; Leong-Sit, P.; Massel, D.; Manlucu, J.; Modi, S.; Krahn, AD.; Skanes, AC.; Yee, R.; Gula, LJ. (2012). "Risk of arrhythmia and sudden death in patients with asymptomatic preexcitation: a meta-analysis". Circulation. 125 (19): 2308–15. doi:10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.111.055350. PMID 22532593. Unknown parameter |month= ignored (help)
  4. Obeyesekere MN, Leong-Sit P, Massel D, Manlucu J, Modi S, Krahn AD; et al. (2012). "Risk of arrhythmia and sudden death in patients with asymptomatic preexcitation: a meta-analysis". Circulation. 125 (19): 2308–15. doi:10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.111.055350. PMID 22532593.
  5. "http://www.cardiology.sk/casopis/606/pdf/04.pdf" (PDF). Retrieved 11 April 2014. External link in |title= (help)
  6. "http://www.cardiology.sk/casopis/606/pdf/04.pdf" (PDF). Retrieved 11 April 2014. External link in |title= (help)
  7. Campbell, RW.; Smith, RA.; Gallagher, JJ.; Pritchett, EL.; Wallace, AG. (1977). "Atrial fibrillation in the preexcitation syndrome". Am J Cardiol. 40 (4): 514–20. PMID 910715. Unknown parameter |month= ignored (help)
  8. Sharma, AD.; Klein, GJ.; Guiraudon, GM.; Milstein, S. (1985). "Atrial fibrillation in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome: incidence after surgical ablation of the accessory pathway". Circulation. 72 (1): 161–9. PMID 4006127. Unknown parameter |month= ignored (help)



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