Traveller vaccination human papillomavirus

Jump to: navigation, search

To read more about human papillomavirus, click here.


Vaccination Main Page

Traveler Vaccination

Home Page

Overview

Cholera

Diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis

Haemophilus influenzae type b

Hepatitis A

Hepatitis B

Hepatitis E

Human papillomavirus

Influenza

Japanese encephalitis

Measles

Meningococcal Disease

Mumps

Pneumococcal disease

Poliomyelitis

Rabies

Rotavirus

Rubella

Tick-borne encephalitis

Tuberculosis

Typhoid fever

Varicella

Yellow fever

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1];Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Seyedmahdi Pahlavani, M.D. [2]

Overview

Protection against human papillomavirus is not specific to the needs of most travellers. In many countries vaccine against human papillomavirus is routinely administered in childhood. Before travelling, missing vaccinations in young girls should be offered according to national recommendations.

Disease cause

Human papillomavirus (HPV)

Transmission

Sexual contact

Nature of the disease

HPV mostly causes transient benign mucosal infection but it can develop to anogenital precancerous conditions and cancers. Some genotypes of HPV may cause anogenital warts and recurrent respiratory papillomatosis.

Geographical distribution

HPV is prevalent globally. The incidence of cervical cancer is highest in Latin America and the Caribbean, sub-Saharan Africa, Melanesia, and southern Asia.

Risk for travellers

Transmission of HPV occurs most commonly through sexual activity.

Vaccine

Two vaccines against HPV infection are available.

The vaccines are intended primarily for girls 9-14 years of age.


Linked-in.jpg