Transposition of the great vessels electrocardiogram

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Dextro-transposition of the great arteries
L-transposition of the great arteries

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-In-Chief: Priyamvada Singh, M.B.B.S. [2]; Cafer Zorkun, M.D., Ph.D. [3]; Keri Shafer, M.D. [4]; Kristin Feeney, B.S. [5]

Overview

There are no specific ECG findings associated with TGA. However, sometimes electrocardiogram may show right axis deviation and right ventricular hypertrophy.

Electrocardiogram

  • Varying degrees of AV block may be seen in all patients.
  • The right axis deviation is moderate or absent, in patients with a large VSD, low pulmonary vascular resistance, and LV volume overload.
  • On the other hand, the right axis deviation is greater if there is a reduced pulmonary arterial blood flow and reduced LV volume as a result of pulmonary vascular disease or pulmonic stenosis.
  • Q waves are present in right precordial leads which resembles inferior wall myocardial infarction.
  • Q waves are absent in left procordial leads.

References

  1. Shaher RM, Deuchar DC (March 1966). "The electrocardiogram in complete transposition of the great vessels". Br Heart J. 28 (2): 265–75. doi:10.1136/hrt.28.2.265. PMC 459068. PMID 4283637.
  2. Fernández F, Laurichesse J, Scebat L, Lenègre J (March 1970). "Electrocardiogram in corrected transposition of the great vessels of the bulbo-ventricular inversion type". Br Heart J. 32 (2): 165–71. doi:10.1136/hrt.32.2.165. PMC 487298. PMID 5440512.




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