Syphilis MRI

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Aysha Aslam, M.B.B.S[2]

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Overview

MRI scan is not diagnostic of syphilis. However, non-specific MRI findings may demonstrate complications of syphilis including neurological, gastrointestinal, and bone findings.[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11][12]

MRI

MRI scan is not diagnostic of syphilis. However, non-specific MRI findings may demonstrate complications of syphilis including neurological, gastrointestinal, and bone findings:[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11]

Neurosyphilis

MRI may help diagnose complications of syphilis such as neurosyphilis. High intensity T2 MRI brain and spinal cord may indicate the following findings:[1][2][3][4][9]

Bone

Skull

  • T2W lesions in the skull showing hyperintensity[10]

Rectal

  • T2W MRI images showing hyperintense thickening of rectal wall (mimicking rectal cancer)[11]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Peng F, Hu X, Zhong X, Wei Q, Jiang Y, Bao J; et al. (2008). "CT and MR findings in HIV-negative neurosyphilis". Eur J Radiol. 66 (1): 1–6. doi:10.1016/j.ejrad.2007.05.018. PMID 17628376.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 Brightbill TC, Ihmeidan IH, Post MJ, Berger JR, Katz DA (1995). "Neurosyphilis in HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients: neuroimaging findings". AJNR Am J Neuroradiol. 16 (4): 703–11. PMID 7611026.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 Mehrabian S, Raycheva M, Traykova M, Stankova T, Penev L, Grigorova O; et al. (2012). "Neurosyphilis with dementia and bilateral hippocampal atrophy on brain magnetic resonance imaging". BMC Neurol. 12: 96. doi:10.1186/1471-2377-12-96. PMC 3517431. PMID 22994551.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 Jeong YM, Hwang HY, Kim HS (2009). "MRI of neurosyphilis presenting as mesiotemporal abnormalities: a case report". Korean J Radiol. 10 (3): 310–2. doi:10.3348/kjr.2009.10.3.310. PMC 2672188. PMID 19412521.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 Szilak I, Marty F, Helft J, Soeiro R (2001). "Neurosyphilis presenting as herpes simplex encephalitis". Clin Infect Dis. 32 (7): 1108–9. doi:10.1086/319598. PMID 11264042.
  6. 6.0 6.1 Bash S, Hathout GM, Cohen S (2001). "Mesiotemporal T2-weighted hyperintensity: neurosyphilis mimicking herpes encephalitis". AJNR Am J Neuroradiol. 22 (2): 314–6. PMID 11156776.
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 Agayeva N, Karli-Oguz K, Saka E (2013). "Teaching NeuroImages: a neurosyphilis case presenting with atypical neuroradiologic findings". Neurology. 80 (11): e119. doi:10.1212/WNL.0b013e318287280b. PMID 23479472.
  8. 8.0 8.1 Khamaysi Z, Bergman R, Telman G, Goldsher D (2014). "Clinical and imaging findings in patients with neurosyphilis: a study of a cohort and review of the literature". Int J Dermatol. 53 (7): 812–9. doi:10.1111/ijd.12095. PMID 24261864.
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 Pandey S (2011). "Magnetic resonance imaging of the spinal cord in a man with tabes dorsalis". J Spinal Cord Med. 34 (6): 609–11. doi:10.1179/2045772311Y.0000000041. PMC 3237288. PMID 22330117 : 22330117 Check |pmid= value (help).
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 Huang I, Leach JL, Fichtenbaum CJ, Narayan RK (2007). "Osteomyelitis of the skull in early-acquired syphilis: evaluation by MR imaging and CT". AJNR Am J Neuroradiol. 28 (2): 307–8. PMID 17297001.
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 Cha JM, Choi SI, Lee JI (2010). "Rectal syphilis mimicking rectal cancer". Yonsei Med J. 51 (2): 276–8. doi:10.3349/ymj.2010.51.2.276. PMC 2824876. PMID 20191023.
  12. 12.0 12.1 Pandey S (2011). "Magnetic resonance imaging of the spinal cord in a man with tabes dorsalis". J Spinal Cord Med. 34 (6): 609–11. doi:10.1179/2045772311Y.0000000041. PMC 3237288. PMID 22330117 : 22330117 Check |pmid= value (help).
  13. Naraghi AM, Salonen DC, Bloom JA, Becker EJ (2010). "Magnetic resonance imaging features of osseous manifestations of early acquired syphilis". Skeletal Radiol. 39 (3): 305–9. doi:10.1007/s00256-009-0806-7. PMID 19795120.

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