Straight leg raise

Jump to: navigation, search

WikiDoc Resources for Straight leg raise

Articles

Most recent articles on Straight leg raise

Most cited articles on Straight leg raise

Review articles on Straight leg raise

Articles on Straight leg raise in N Eng J Med, Lancet, BMJ

Media

Powerpoint slides on Straight leg raise

Images of Straight leg raise

Photos of Straight leg raise

Podcasts & MP3s on Straight leg raise

Videos on Straight leg raise

Evidence Based Medicine

Cochrane Collaboration on Straight leg raise

Bandolier on Straight leg raise

TRIP on Straight leg raise

Clinical Trials

Ongoing Trials on Straight leg raise at Clinical Trials.gov

Trial results on Straight leg raise

Clinical Trials on Straight leg raise at Google

Guidelines / Policies / Govt

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse on Straight leg raise

NICE Guidance on Straight leg raise

NHS PRODIGY Guidance

FDA on Straight leg raise

CDC on Straight leg raise

Books

Books on Straight leg raise

News

Straight leg raise in the news

Be alerted to news on Straight leg raise

News trends on Straight leg raise

Commentary

Blogs on Straight leg raise

Definitions

Definitions of Straight leg raise

Patient Resources / Community

Patient resources on Straight leg raise

Discussion groups on Straight leg raise

Patient Handouts on Straight leg raise

Directions to Hospitals Treating Straight leg raise

Risk calculators and risk factors for Straight leg raise

Healthcare Provider Resources

Symptoms of Straight leg raise

Causes & Risk Factors for Straight leg raise

Diagnostic studies for Straight leg raise

Treatment of Straight leg raise

Continuing Medical Education (CME)

CME Programs on Straight leg raise

International

Straight leg raise en Espanol

Straight leg raise en Francais

Business

Straight leg raise in the Marketplace

Patents on Straight leg raise

Experimental / Informatics

List of terms related to Straight leg raise

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]

Synonyms and Keywords: Lasègue's sign; lasègue test

Overview

The straight leg raise is a test done during the physical examination to determine whether a patient with low back pain has an underlying herniated disk.

Historical Perspective

It was named after Charles Lasègue (1816-1883).

Technique

With the patient lying down on a table, the examiner lifts the patient's leg while the knee is straight.

A variation is to lift the leg while the patient is sitting.[1] However, this reduces the sensitivity of the test.[2]

Interpretation

"The straight leg raise test is positive if pain in the sciatic distribution is reproduced between 30° and 70° passive flexion of the straight leg." [3]

A meta-analysis reported the accuracy as:[4]

If raising the opposite leg causes pain (cross straight leg raising):

References

  1. Waddell G, McCulloch JA, Kummel E, Venner RM (1980). "Nonorganic physical signs in low-back pain". Spine. 5 (2): 117–25. PMID 6446157. 
  2. Rabin A, Gerszten PC, Karausky P, Bunker CH, Potter DM, Welch WC (2007). "The sensitivity of the seated straight-leg raise test compared with the supine straight-leg raise test in patients presenting with magnetic resonance imaging evidence of lumbar nerve root compression". Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation. 88 (7): 840–3. PMID 17601462. doi:10.1016/j.apmr.2007.04.016. 
  3. Speed C (2004). "Low back pain". BMJ. 328 (7448): 1119–21. PMID 15130982. doi:10.1136/bmj.328.7448.1119. 
  4. Devillé WL, van der Windt DA, Dzaferagić A, Bezemer PD, Bouter LM (2000). "The test of Lasègue: systematic review of the accuracy in diagnosing herniated discs". Spine. 25 (9): 1140–7. PMID 10788860. 

Linked-in.jpg