Stasis dermatitis

Jump to: navigation, search

WikiDoc Resources for Stasis dermatitis

Articles

Most recent articles on Stasis dermatitis

Most cited articles on Stasis dermatitis

Review articles on Stasis dermatitis

Articles on Stasis dermatitis in N Eng J Med, Lancet, BMJ

Media

Powerpoint slides on Stasis dermatitis

Images of Stasis dermatitis

Photos of Stasis dermatitis

Podcasts & MP3s on Stasis dermatitis

Videos on Stasis dermatitis

Evidence Based Medicine

Cochrane Collaboration on Stasis dermatitis

Bandolier on Stasis dermatitis

TRIP on Stasis dermatitis

Clinical Trials

Ongoing Trials on Stasis dermatitis at Clinical Trials.gov

Trial results on Stasis dermatitis

Clinical Trials on Stasis dermatitis at Google

Guidelines / Policies / Govt

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse on Stasis dermatitis

NICE Guidance on Stasis dermatitis

NHS PRODIGY Guidance

FDA on Stasis dermatitis

CDC on Stasis dermatitis

Books

Books on Stasis dermatitis

News

Stasis dermatitis in the news

Be alerted to news on Stasis dermatitis

News trends on Stasis dermatitis

Commentary

Blogs on Stasis dermatitis

Definitions

Definitions of Stasis dermatitis

Patient Resources / Community

Patient resources on Stasis dermatitis

Discussion groups on Stasis dermatitis

Patient Handouts on Stasis dermatitis

Directions to Hospitals Treating Stasis dermatitis

Risk calculators and risk factors for Stasis dermatitis

Healthcare Provider Resources

Symptoms of Stasis dermatitis

Causes & Risk Factors for Stasis dermatitis

Diagnostic studies for Stasis dermatitis

Treatment of Stasis dermatitis

Continuing Medical Education (CME)

CME Programs on Stasis dermatitis

International

Stasis dermatitis en Espanol

Stasis dermatitis en Francais

Business

Stasis dermatitis in the Marketplace

Patents on Stasis dermatitis

Experimental / Informatics

List of terms related to Stasis dermatitis

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Jesus Rosario Hernandez, M.D. [2].

Synonyms and Keywords: Congestion eczema, gravitational dermatitis, gravitational eczema, stasis eczema, varicose eczema.

Overview

Stasis dermatitis (also known as "Congestion eczema," "Gravitational dermatitis," "Gravitational eczema," "Stasis eczema," and "Varicose eczema")[1] refers to the skin changes that occur in the leg as a result of "stasis" or blood pooling from insufficient venous return; the alternative name of varicose eczema comes from a common cause of this being varicose veins.[citation needed]

Insufficient venous return results in increased pressure in the capillaries with the result that both fluid and cells may "leak" out of the capillaries. This results in red cells breaking down, with iron containing hemosiderin possibly contributing to the pathology of this entity.[2]

Symptoms

  • The skin appears thin, brown and tissue-like, with possible skin lesions (macule or patches), red spots, superficial skin irritation and/or darkening and/or thickening of the skin at the ankles or legs
  • The skin may be weakened and may ulcerate in areas
  • Legs, ankles, or other areas may become swollen
  • Open sores, ulcers
  • Itching and/or leg pains
  • Sometimes pain may persist from swollen tissues and may feel like "stabbing" or "needle pricks"

The cracks and poor skin-condition of this disorder predisposes for the entry of bacterial infection causing spreading cellulitis infection in the leg. If the skin condition deteriorates further and breaks down, a venous ulcer (also known as a stasis ulcer) may form.

Gallery

Skin

Extremities

Treatment

Treatment may consist of topical applications of steroid based creams and the use of compression stockings to help force the underlying buildup of fluids back out of the lower leg or intermittent pneumatic compression pumps.[medical citation needed]

References

  1. Rapini, Ronald P.; Bolognia, Jean L.; Jorizzo, Joseph L. (2007). Dermatology: 2-Volume Set. St. Louis: Mosby. pp. Chapter 14. ISBN 1-4160-2999-0.
  2. "Stasis dermatitis and ulcers". United States National Institute of Health. Retrieved July 31, 2008.

Linked-in.jpg