Smoking screening

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Case #1

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Usama Talib, BSc, MD [2]

Overview

Screening for smoking should be done on every visit to the physician by asking detailed questions related to smoking status and smoking history.The US Preventive Services Task Force guidelines recommend that clinicians ask all patients about tobacco use and provide tobacco cessation interventions for those who use tobacco.[1]

Screening

Screening for smoking is done on every visit to the physician by asking detailed questions related to smoking status and smoking history. The US Preventive Services Task Force guidelines recommend that clinicians ask all patients about tobacco use and provide tobacco cessation interventions for those who use tobacco.[1]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Siu AL, U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (2015). "Behavioral and Pharmacotherapy Interventions for Tobacco Smoking Cessation in Adults, Including Pregnant Women: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement". Ann Intern Med. 163 (8): 622–34. doi:10.7326/M15-2023. PMID 26389730.



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