Smoking epidemiology and demographics

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Case #1

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Usama Talib, BSc, MD [2]

Overview

Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable disease, disability, and death in the United States, accounting for more than 480,000 deaths every year, or 1 of every 5 deaths. In 2015, about 15 of every 100 U.S. adults aged 18 years or older (15.1%) currently smoked cigarettes, this means an estimated 36.5 million adults in the United States currently smoke cigarettes. It is more common among men than in women. Smoking is more common among adults aged 25-44. It is more common among non-Hispanic American Indians/Alaska Natives than other races.[1][2][3]

Epidemiology and Demographics

The epidemiology and demographics of smoking can be explained as follows:[1][2][3][4][5]

  • Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable disease, disability, and death in the United States, accounting for more than 480,000 deaths every year, or 1 of every 5 deaths.
  • In 2015, about 15 of every 100 U.S. adults aged 18 years or older (15.1%) currently smoked cigarettes, this means an estimated 36.5 million adults in the United States currently smoke cigarettes.
  • Current smoking has declined from nearly 21 of every 100 adults (20.9%) in 2005 to about 15 of every 100 adults (15.1%) in 2015.
  • Nearly 40 million US adults still smoke cigarettes, and about 4.7 million middle and high school students use at least one tobacco product, including e-cigarettes.
  • Every day, more than 3,800 youth younger than 18 years smoke their first cigarette.
  • Each year, nearly half a million Americans die prematurely of smoking or exposure to secondhand smoke and more than 16 million Americans live with a smoking-related disease.
  • Each year, the United States spends nearly $170 billion on medical care to treat smoking-related disease in adults.

The epidemiology of the current smoking status based on different descriptive characteristics is as follows:

Gender

  • Nearly 17 of every 100 adult men (16.7%).
  • More than 13 of every 100 adult women (13.6%).

Age

  • 13 of every 100 adults aged 18–24 years (13.0%).
  • Nearly 18 of every 100 adults aged 25–44 years (17.7%)
  • 17 of every 100 adults aged 45–64 years (17.0%).
  • More than 8 of every 100 adults aged 65 years and older (8.4%).

Race

  • Nearly 22 of every 100 non-Hispanic American Indians/Alaska Natives (21.9%).
  • More than 20 of every 100 non-Hispanic multiple race individuals (20.2%).
  • Nearly 17 of every 100 non-Hispanic Blacks (16.7%).
  • More than 16 of every 100 non-Hispanic Whites (16.6%).
  • More than 10 of every 100 Hispanics (10.1%).
  • 7 of every 100 non-Hispanic Asians* (7.0%).

Education

  • More than 24 of every 100 adults with 12 or fewer years of education (no diploma) (24.2%).
  • About 34 of every 100 adults with a GED certificate (34.1%).
  • Nearly 20 of every 100 adults with a high school diploma (19.8%).
  • More than 18 of every 100 adults with some college (no degree) (18.5%).
  • More than 16 of every 100 adults with an associate's degree (16.6%).
  • More than 7 of every 100 adults with an undergraduate college degree (7.4%).
  • More than 3 of every 100 adults with a graduate degree (3.6%).

Socio-economic status

  • About 26 of every 100 adults who live below the poverty level (26.1%).
  • Nearly 14 of every 100 adults who live at or above the poverty level (13.9%).

Geographical Area

  • Nearly 19 of every 100 adults who live in the Midwest (18.7%).
  • More than 15 of every 100 adults who live in the South (15.3%).
  • More than 13 of every 100 adults who live in the Northeast (13.5%).
  • More than 12 of every 100 adults who live in the West (12.4%).

Disability

  • More than 21 of every 100 adults who reported having a disability/limitation (21.5%)
  • Nearly 14 of every 100 adults who reported having no disability/limitation (13.8%)

Sexual Orientation

  • More than 20 of every 100 lesbian/gay/bisexual adults (20.6%)
  • Nearly 15 of every 100 straight adults (14.9%)

Adult Smokers Distribution

The distribution of smokers in the US can be depicted by this picture.[6]

Distribution of smokers in the US


References

  1. 1.0 1.1 "CDC - 2010 Surgeon General's Report - Consumer Booklet - Smoking & Tobacco Use".
  2. 2.0 2.1 "QuickStats: Number of Deaths from 10 Leading Causes — National Vital Statistics System, United States, 2010".
  3. 3.0 3.1 "CDC - 2014 Surgeon General's Report - Smoking & Tobacco Use".
  4. "CDC - Fact Sheet - Current Cigarette Smoking Among Adults in the United States - Smoking & Tobacco Use".
  5. WYNDER EL, GRAHAM EA (1951). "Etiologic factors in bronchiogenic carcinoma with special reference to industrial exposures; report of eight hundred fifty-seven proved cases". AMA Arch Ind Hyg Occup Med. 4 (3): 221–35. PMID 14867935.
  6. "Map of Cigarette Use Among Adults | STATE System | CDC".



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