Sickle cell trait

Jump to: navigation, search
Sickle cell trait
ICD-10 D57.3
ICD-9 282.5
MeSH D012805

WikiDoc Resources for Sickle cell trait

Articles

Most recent articles on Sickle cell trait

Most cited articles on Sickle cell trait

Review articles on Sickle cell trait

Articles on Sickle cell trait in N Eng J Med, Lancet, BMJ

Media

Powerpoint slides on Sickle cell trait

Images of Sickle cell trait

Photos of Sickle cell trait

Podcasts & MP3s on Sickle cell trait

Videos on Sickle cell trait

Evidence Based Medicine

Cochrane Collaboration on Sickle cell trait

Bandolier on Sickle cell trait

TRIP on Sickle cell trait

Clinical Trials

Ongoing Trials on Sickle cell trait at Clinical Trials.gov

Trial results on Sickle cell trait

Clinical Trials on Sickle cell trait at Google

Guidelines / Policies / Govt

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse on Sickle cell trait

NICE Guidance on Sickle cell trait

NHS PRODIGY Guidance

FDA on Sickle cell trait

CDC on Sickle cell trait

Books

Books on Sickle cell trait

News

Sickle cell trait in the news

Be alerted to news on Sickle cell trait

News trends on Sickle cell trait

Commentary

Blogs on Sickle cell trait

Definitions

Definitions of Sickle cell trait

Patient Resources / Community

Patient resources on Sickle cell trait

Discussion groups on Sickle cell trait

Patient Handouts on Sickle cell trait

Directions to Hospitals Treating Sickle cell trait

Risk calculators and risk factors for Sickle cell trait

Healthcare Provider Resources

Symptoms of Sickle cell trait

Causes & Risk Factors for Sickle cell trait

Diagnostic studies for Sickle cell trait

Treatment of Sickle cell trait

Continuing Medical Education (CME)

CME Programs on Sickle cell trait

International

Sickle cell trait en Espanol

Sickle cell trait en Francais

Business

Sickle cell trait in the Marketplace

Patents on Sickle cell trait

Experimental / Informatics

List of terms related to Sickle cell trait

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]


Overview

Sickle cell trait describes the way a person can inherit some of the genes of sickle cell disease, but not develop symptoms. Sickle cell disease is a blood disorder in which the body produces an abnormal type of the oxygen-carrying substance hemoglobin in the red blood cells.

Normal hemoglobin is called hemoglobin A, but people with sickle cell disease have only hemoglobin S, which turns normal, round red blood cells into abnormally curved (sickle) shapes.

Normally, a person inherits two genes (one from each parent) that produce beta-globin, a protein needed to produce normal hemoglobin (hemoglobin A). A person with sickle cell trait inherits one normal beta-globin gene (hemoglobin A) and one defective gene (hemoglobin S).

People with sickle cell trait rarely have symptoms due to the condition because they also have some normal hemoglobin. However, they can pass the sickle cell trait to their children, and in rare cases, exercise-induced dehydration or exhaustion can cause healthy red blood cells to turn sickle-shaped, which can cause death.

A person in whom both beta-globin genes are abnormal (they produce hemoglobin S) has sickle cell disease, which can cause serious problems. Both parents must have either the sickle cell trait or the disease itself for a child to have sickle cell disease.

People who have the sickle cell trait have reduced susceptibility to malaria, due to natural selection for the heterozygote advantage. However, people with the sickle cell trait can still contract severe cases of malaria.


Linked-in.jpg