Roseola physical examination

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Omodamola Aje B.Sc, M.D. [2]

Overview

Physical examination findings in a patient with roseola will depend on the presenting phase (febrile or rash). Vital signs are affected in the febrile phase and stabilize in the rash phase. Conversely, in the rash phase, vital signs become normal while skin appearance is affected.

Physical Examination

Appearance of the patient

Physical examination findings in a patient with roseola will depend on the presenting phase (febrile or rash). Vital signs are affected in the febrile phase and stabilize in the rash phase. Conversely, in the rash phase, vital signs become normal while skin appearance is affected.[1][2][3]

Vital signs

Vital signs Skin manifestations
Febrile phase None
Rash phase Within normal limits Maculopapular rash

Skin

  • Blanching, non-pruritic macular or maculopapular rash starting on the neck and trunks and extending towards face and extremities.
  • Rash is sometimes vesicular.
  • Rash can last anywhere from a few hours to a 3 days.[1][1][2][4][5]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 JURETIC M (1963). "Exanthema subitum a review of 243 cases". Helv Paediatr Acta. 18: 80–95. PMID 13958107.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Meade RH (1989). "Exanthem subitum (roseola infantum)". Clin Dermatol. 7 (1): 92–6. PMID 2647267.
  3. Asano Y, Yoshikawa T, Suga S, Kobayashi I, Nakashima T, Yazaki T; et al. (1994). "Clinical features of infants with primary human herpesvirus 6 infection (exanthem subitum, roseola infantum)". Pediatrics. 93 (1): 104–8. PMID 8265302.
  4. BERLINER BC (1960). "A physical sign useful in diagnosis of roseola infantum before the rash". Pediatrics. 25: 1034. PMID 13799552.
  5. Huang CT, Lin LH (2013). "Differentiating roseola infantum with pyuria from urinary tract infection". Pediatr Int. 55 (2): 214–8. doi:10.1111/ped.12015. PMID 23190314.

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