Roseola pathophysiology

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Omodamola Aje B.Sc, M.D. [2]

Overview

Roseola has two phases, the febrile and the rash (maculopapular) phase. During the first phase, HHV6 replicates in salivary glands and is secreted as primary source of infection. After completes resolution of the febrile phase, due to the latency of the virus in the lymphocytes and monocytes, the rash phase begins.

Pathophysiology

Roseola has two phases:

  1. The febrile phase
  2. The rash phase

Transmission of infection

The febrile phase

The rash phase

Pathogenesis

Genetics

Chromosomal integration of HHV-6A and HHV-6B is responsible for transmission of infection from the parents to the newborn and is observed in 1% of the population.

Associated conditions

A more serious form of HHV 6 is seen in older children, immunocompromised adults and organ transplant patients.

Gross pathology

There are no gross pathologic findings associated with roseola.

Microscopic pathology

There are no microscopic findings associated with roseola.

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 JURETIC M (1963). "Exanthema subitum a review of 243 cases". Helv Paediatr Acta. 18: 80–95. PMID 13958107.
  2. Asano Y, Yoshikawa T, Suga S, Kobayashi I, Nakashima T, Yazaki T; et al. (1994). "Clinical features of infants with primary human herpesvirus 6 infection (exanthem subitum, roseola infantum)". Pediatrics. 93 (1): 104–8. PMID 8265302.
  3. Stoeckle MY (2000). "The spectrum of human herpesvirus 6 infection: from roseola infantum to adult disease". Annu Rev Med. 51: 423–30. doi:10.1146/annurev.med.51.1.423. PMID 10774474.
  4. 4.0 4.1 BERENBERG W, WRIGHT S, JANEWAY CA (1949). "Roseola infantum (exanthem subitum)". N Engl J Med. 241 (7): 253–9. doi:10.1056/NEJM194908182410701. PMID 18138680.

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