Roseola epidemiology and demographics

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Omodamola Aje B.Sc, M.D. [2]

Overview

There is no accurate data for the prevalence or incidence of roseola. This is because the disease is a self limiting disease and it is under reported in most cases. Roseola is an illness of young children, with a peak prevalence between 7 and 13 months. Ninety percent of cases occur in children younger than two years. Roseola occurs equally in boys and girls. It occurs throughout the year, although outbreaks may occur in groups according to season .

Epidemiology and demographics

Prevalence

  • There is no accurate data for the prevalence or incidence of roseola.
  • More than 90% of adult populations in developed countries are seropositive for HHV 6.

Age

Roseola commonly affects young children between the ages of 7 and 13 months.[1]

Gender

  • Males and females are affected equally by roseola.[2]

Race

  • There is no racial predilection for roseola.

Developed countries

  • HHV6 infection is nearly universal accounting for 10-45% of febrile illness in infants.

Developing countries

  • There is a strong association of HHV 6A in Zambian children when compared to rest of the world.

References

  1. JURETIC M (1963). "Exanthema subitum a review of 243 cases". Helv Paediatr Acta. 18: 80–95. PMID 13958107.
  2. Asano Y, Yoshikawa T, Suga S, Kobayashi I, Nakashima T, Yazaki T; et al. (1994). "Clinical features of infants with primary human herpesvirus 6 infection (exanthem subitum, roseola infantum)". Pediatrics. 93 (1): 104–8. PMID 8265302.

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