Respiratory acidosis natural history, complications and prognosis

Jump to: navigation, search

Respiratory acidosis Microchapters

Home

Patient Information

Overview

Historical Perspective

Classification

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Respiratory acidosis from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Screening

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

Chest X Ray

CT

Other Imaging Findings

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Surgery

Primary Prevention

Secondary Prevention

Future or Investigational Therapies

Case Studies

Case #1

Respiratory acidosis natural history, complications and prognosis On the Web

Most recent articles

Most cited articles

Review articles

CME Programs

Powerpoint slides

Images

American Roentgen Ray Society Images of Respiratory acidosis natural history, complications and prognosis

All Images
X-rays
Echo & Ultrasound
CT Images
MRI

Ongoing Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse

NICE Guidance

FDA on Respiratory acidosis natural history, complications and prognosis

CDC on Respiratory acidosis natural history, complications and prognosis

Respiratory acidosis natural history, complications and prognosis in the news

Blogs on Respiratory acidosis natural history, complications and prognosis

Directions to Hospitals Treating Respiratory acidosis

Risk calculators and risk factors for Respiratory acidosis natural history, complications and prognosis

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Vamsikrishna Gunnam M.B.B.S[2]

Overview

Respiratory acidosis is an result of imbalance between acid-base due to alveolar hypoventilation.The normal range is 35-45 mm Hg for PaCO2.Increase in the production of carbon dioxide due to  failure of ventilation results in sudden increase of the partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2) above the normal range. Alveolar hypoventilation is one of the cause to increased PaCO2 which is is called hypercapnia.Hypercapnia and respiratory acidosis occur while impairment in air flow happens and the elimination of carbon dioxide by the respiratory system is much less than the production of carbon dioxide in the tissues.Respiratory acidosis encountered in the emergency department and inpatient patients, as well as in intensive care units and postoperative patients.

Natural History, Complications, and Prognosis

Natural History[1][2]

  • Respiration acidosis(primary hypercapnia), is the acid-base ailment that consequences from an increase in carbon dioxide in the body.
  • Acute respiratory acidosis happens with respiratory failure, which could result from any unexpected respiratory parenchymal, airways (eg, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease ), pleural, chest wall, neuromuscular eg, spinal cord damage, or central nervous system disorders.
  • Chronic respiratory acidosis can result from several procedures and is typified by way of a sustained increase in arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide, ensuing in renal adaptation, and an extra marked increase in plasma bicarbonate.
  • Different mechanisms of respiratory acidosis include increased carbon dioxide production, alveolar hypoventilation, abnormal breathing drive, abnormalities of the chest wall and respiratory muscles.
  • Despite the fact that the symptoms, signs, results of respiratory acidosis are numerous, the major effects are seen on the central nervous and cardiovascular systems which are life threating.

Complications

Common complications of respiratory acidosis include:

Depending upon the level and rate of CO2 accumulation in arterial blood the complications of respiratory acidosis are pulmonary, neurologic and cardiovascular complications like

Prognosis

Depending on the level of the carbon-dioxide levels at the time of diagnosis and the disease causing the respiratory acidosis defines the prognosis.

References

  1. Epstein SK, Singh N (April 2001). "Respiratory acidosis". Respir Care. 46 (4): 366–83. PMID 11262556.
  2. Johnson, Rebecca A. (2017). "A Quick Reference on Respiratory Acidosis". Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practice. 47 (2): 185–189. doi:10.1016/j.cvsm.2016.10.012. ISSN 0195-5616.

Linked-in.jpg