Respiratory acidosis historical perspective

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Vamsikrishna Gunnam M.B.B.S[2]

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Overview

Respiratory acidosis was discussed as early as in 1950s by Henderson–Hasselbalch, Bronsted–Lowry, Stewart. But Arrhenius was the one who defines acid for the first time.

Historical Perspective

Discovery

  • In the early 1950s Henderson–Hasselbalch equation and the Bronsted–Lowry definition discussed about acidbase disorders.[1]
  • In the early 1950s Stewart repackaged ideas of acidbase in the late 1970s, including the Van Slyke definition of an acid.[2]
  • In the early 1980s, Arrhenius defines acid as a substance that, when dissolved in water, produces an increased concentration of hydrogen ions.
  • The word acid is derived from the Latin word 'acidus' which means sour.

References

  1. Story DA (August 2004). "Bench-to-bedside review: a brief history of clinical acid-base". Crit Care. 8 (4): 253–8. doi:10.1186/cc2861. PMC 522833. PMID 15312207.
  2. Morgan TJ (May 2009). "The Stewart approach--one clinician's perspective". Clin Biochem Rev. 30 (2): 41–54. PMC 2702213. PMID 19565024.

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