RPS28

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Ribosomal protein S28
Identifiers
Symbols RPS28 ;
External IDs OMIM: 603685 MGI1859516 HomoloGene68150
Orthologs

| | bgcolor="#C3FDB8" | Human | bgcolor="#C3FDB8" | Mouse |-

    | bgcolor="#C3FDB8" | Entrez 
    | bgcolor="#eeeeee" style="border-top:2px solid #dddddd; border-right:2px solid #dddddd"| 6234
    | bgcolor="#eeeeee" style="border-top:2px solid #dddddd; border-right:2px solid #dddddd"| 54127

|-

     | bgcolor="#C3FDB8" | Ensembl
     | bgcolor="#eeeeee" style="border-top:2px solid #dddddd; border-right:2px solid #dddddd"| na
     | bgcolor="#eeeeee" style="border-top:2px solid #dddddd; border-right:2px solid #dddddd"| ENSMUSG00000072940

|-

    | bgcolor="#C3FDB8" | Uniprot
    | bgcolor="#eeeeee" style="border-top:2px solid #dddddd; border-right:2px solid #dddddd"| na
    | bgcolor="#eeeeee" style="border-top:2px solid #dddddd; border-right:2px solid #dddddd"| Q059I1

|-

    | bgcolor="#C3FDB8" | Refseq
    | bgcolor="#eeeeee" style="border-top:2px solid #dddddd; border-right:2px solid #dddddd" | NM_001031 (mRNA)
NP_001022 (protein)
| bgcolor="#eeeeee" style="border-top:2px solid #dddddd; border-right:2px solid #dddddd" |NM_016844 (mRNA)
NP_058540 (protein)

|-

    | bgcolor="#C3FDB8" | Location
    | bgcolor="#eeeeee" style="border-top:2px solid #dddddd; border-right:2px solid #dddddd"| na
    | bgcolor="#eeeeee" style="border-top:2px solid #dddddd; border-right:2px solid #dddddd"|  Chr 6: 86.3 -  86.3 Mb 

|-

|-

    | bgcolor="#C3FDB8" | Pubmed search 
    | bgcolor="#eeeeee" style="border-top:2px solid #dddddd; border-right:2px solid #dddddd"| [1]
| bgcolor="#eeeeee" style="border-top:2px solid #dddddd; border-right:2px solid #dddddd"| [2]
Species Human Mouse
Entrez n/a n/a
Ensembl n/a n/a
UniProt n/a n/a
RefSeq (mRNA) n/a n/a
RefSeq (protein) n/a n/a
Location (UCSC) n/a n/a
PubMed search n/a n/a

Ribosomal protein S28, also known as RPS28, is a human gene.[1]

Ribosomes, the organelles that catalyze protein synthesis, consist of a small 40S subunit and a large 60S subunit. Together these subunits are composed of 4 RNA species and approximately 80 structurally distinct proteins. This gene encodes a ribosomal protein that is a component of the 40S subunit. The protein belongs to the S28E family of ribosomal proteins. It is located in the cytoplasm. As is typical for genes encoding ribosomal proteins, there are multiple processed pseudogenes of this gene dispersed through the genome.[1]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 "Entrez Gene: RPS28 ribosomal protein S28".

Further reading

  • Wool IG, Chan YL, Glück A (1996). "Structure and evolution of mammalian ribosomal proteins". Biochem. Cell Biol. 73 (11–12): 933–47. PMID 8722009.
  • Hori N, Murakawa K, Matoba R; et al. (1993). "A cDNA sequence of human ribosomal protein, homologue of yeast S28". Nucleic Acids Res. 21 (18): 4394. PMID 8415000.
  • Vladimirov SN, Ivanov AV, Karpova GG; et al. (1996). "Characterization of the human small-ribosomal-subunit proteins by N-terminal and internal sequencing, and mass spectrometry". Eur. J. Biochem. 239 (1): 144–9. PMID 8706699.
  • Kenmochi N, Kawaguchi T, Rozen S; et al. (1998). "A map of 75 human ribosomal protein genes". Genome Res. 8 (5): 509–23. PMID 9582194.
  • Yoshihama M, Uechi T, Asakawa S; et al. (2002). "The human ribosomal protein genes: sequencing and comparative analysis of 73 genes". Genome Res. 12 (3): 379–90. doi:10.1101/gr.214202. PMID 11875025.
  • Strausberg RL, Feingold EA, Grouse LH; et al. (2003). "Generation and initial analysis of more than 15,000 full-length human and mouse cDNA sequences". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99 (26): 16899–903. doi:10.1073/pnas.242603899. PMID 12477932.
  • Gerhard DS, Wagner L, Feingold EA; et al. (2004). "The status, quality, and expansion of the NIH full-length cDNA project: the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC)". Genome Res. 14 (10B): 2121–7. doi:10.1101/gr.2596504. PMID 15489334.
  • Yu Y, Ji H, Doudna JA, Leary JA (2005). "Mass spectrometric analysis of the human 40S ribosomal subunit: native and HCV IRES-bound complexes". Protein Sci. 14 (6): 1438–46. doi:10.1110/ps.041293005. PMID 15883184.
  • Stelzl U, Worm U, Lalowski M; et al. (2005). "A human protein-protein interaction network: a resource for annotating the proteome". Cell. 122 (6): 957–68. doi:10.1016/j.cell.2005.08.029. PMID 16169070.
  • Rual JF, Venkatesan K, Hao T; et al. (2005). "Towards a proteome-scale map of the human protein-protein interaction network". Nature. 437 (7062): 1173–8. doi:10.1038/nature04209. PMID 16189514.
  • Kimura K, Wakamatsu A, Suzuki Y; et al. (2006). "Diversification of transcriptional modulation: large-scale identification and characterization of putative alternative promoters of human genes". Genome Res. 16 (1): 55–65. doi:10.1101/gr.4039406. PMID 16344560.
  • Ewing RM, Chu P, Elisma F; et al. (2007). "Large-scale mapping of human protein-protein interactions by mass spectrometry". Mol. Syst. Biol. 3: 89. doi:10.1038/msb4100134. PMID 17353931.

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