RPS24

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Ribosomal protein S24
Identifiers
Symbols RPS24 ; DBA3; DKFZp686N1586
External IDs OMIM: 602412 MGI3645112 HomoloGene68148
Orthologs

| | bgcolor="#C3FDB8" | Human | bgcolor="#C3FDB8" | Mouse |-

    | bgcolor="#C3FDB8" | Entrez 
    | bgcolor="#eeeeee" style="border-top:2px solid #dddddd; border-right:2px solid #dddddd"| 6229
    | bgcolor="#eeeeee" style="border-top:2px solid #dddddd; border-right:2px solid #dddddd"| 547267

|-

     | bgcolor="#C3FDB8" | Ensembl
     | bgcolor="#eeeeee" style="border-top:2px solid #dddddd; border-right:2px solid #dddddd"| ENSG00000138326
     | bgcolor="#eeeeee" style="border-top:2px solid #dddddd; border-right:2px solid #dddddd"| ENSMUSG00000062284

|-

    | bgcolor="#C3FDB8" | Uniprot
    | bgcolor="#eeeeee" style="border-top:2px solid #dddddd; border-right:2px solid #dddddd"| P62847
    | bgcolor="#eeeeee" style="border-top:2px solid #dddddd; border-right:2px solid #dddddd"| na

|-

    | bgcolor="#C3FDB8" | Refseq
    | bgcolor="#eeeeee" style="border-top:2px solid #dddddd; border-right:2px solid #dddddd" | NM_001026 (mRNA)
NP_001017 (protein)
| bgcolor="#eeeeee" style="border-top:2px solid #dddddd; border-right:2px solid #dddddd" |XM_001000591 (mRNA)
XP_001000591 (protein)

|-

    | bgcolor="#C3FDB8" | Location
    | bgcolor="#eeeeee" style="border-top:2px solid #dddddd; border-right:2px solid #dddddd"|  Chr 10: 79.46 - 79.49 Mb 
    | bgcolor="#eeeeee" style="border-top:2px solid #dddddd; border-right:2px solid #dddddd"|  Chr 16: 45.12 -  45.12 Mb 

|-

|-

    | bgcolor="#C3FDB8" | Pubmed search 
    | bgcolor="#eeeeee" style="border-top:2px solid #dddddd; border-right:2px solid #dddddd"| [1]
| bgcolor="#eeeeee" style="border-top:2px solid #dddddd; border-right:2px solid #dddddd"| [2]
Species Human Mouse
Entrez n/a n/a
Ensembl n/a n/a
UniProt n/a n/a
RefSeq (mRNA) n/a n/a
RefSeq (protein) n/a n/a
Location (UCSC) n/a n/a
PubMed search n/a n/a

Ribosomal protein S24, also known as RPS24, is a human gene.[1]

Ribosomes, the organelles that catalyze protein synthesis, consist of a small 40S subunit and a large 60S subunit. Together these subunits are composed of 4 RNA species and approximately 80 structurally distinct proteins. This gene encodes a ribosomal protein that is a component of the 40S subunit. The protein belongs to the S24E family of ribosomal proteins. It is located in the cytoplasm. Alternative splice variants that encode different protein isoforms exist. As is typical for genes encoding ribosomal proteins, there are multiple processed pseudogenes of this gene dispersed through the genome.[1]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 "Entrez Gene: RPS24 ribosomal protein S24".

Further reading

  • Wool IG, Chan YL, Glück A (1996). "Structure and evolution of mammalian ribosomal proteins". Biochem. Cell Biol. 73 (11–12): 933–47. PMID 8722009.
  • Huang RT, Li DR, Wei J; et al. (1992). "Isolation and identification of hepatitis E virus in Xinjiang, China". J. Gen. Virol. 73 ( Pt 5): 1143–8. PMID 1588318.
  • Brown SJ, Jewell A, Maki CG, Roufa DJ (1990). "A cDNA encoding human ribosomal protein S24". Gene. 91 (2): 293–6. PMID 2210388.
  • Xu WB, Roufa DJ (1996). "The gene encoding human ribosomal protein S24 and tissue-specific expression of differentially spliced mRNAs". Gene. 169 (2): 257–62. PMID 8647458.
  • Vladimirov SN, Ivanov AV, Karpova GG; et al. (1996). "Characterization of the human small-ribosomal-subunit proteins by N-terminal and internal sequencing, and mass spectrometry". Eur. J. Biochem. 239 (1): 144–9. PMID 8706699.
  • Jones AM, Marzella R, Rocchi M, Hewitt JE (1997). "Mapping of the human ribosomal small subunit protein gene RPS24 to the chromosome 10q22-q23 boundary". Genomics. 39 (1): 121–2. doi:10.1006/geno.1996.4442. PMID 9027498.
  • Kenmochi N, Kawaguchi T, Rozen S; et al. (1998). "A map of 75 human ribosomal protein genes". Genome Res. 8 (5): 509–23. PMID 9582194.
  • Hartley JL, Temple GF, Brasch MA (2001). "DNA cloning using in vitro site-specific recombination". Genome Res. 10 (11): 1788–95. PMID 11076863.
  • Wiemann S, Weil B, Wellenreuther R; et al. (2001). "Toward a catalog of human genes and proteins: sequencing and analysis of 500 novel complete protein coding human cDNAs". Genome Res. 11 (3): 422–35. doi:10.1101/gr.154701. PMID 11230166.
  • Strausberg RL, Feingold EA, Grouse LH; et al. (2003). "Generation and initial analysis of more than 15,000 full-length human and mouse cDNA sequences". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99 (26): 16899–903. doi:10.1073/pnas.242603899. PMID 12477932.
  • Gerhard DS, Wagner L, Feingold EA; et al. (2004). "The status, quality, and expansion of the NIH full-length cDNA project: the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC)". Genome Res. 14 (10B): 2121–7. doi:10.1101/gr.2596504. PMID 15489334.
  • Wiemann S, Arlt D, Huber W; et al. (2004). "From ORFeome to biology: a functional genomics pipeline". Genome Res. 14 (10B): 2136–44. doi:10.1101/gr.2576704. PMID 15489336.
  • Yu Y, Ji H, Doudna JA, Leary JA (2005). "Mass spectrometric analysis of the human 40S ribosomal subunit: native and HCV IRES-bound complexes". Protein Sci. 14 (6): 1438–46. doi:10.1110/ps.041293005. PMID 15883184.
  • Rual JF, Venkatesan K, Hao T; et al. (2005). "Towards a proteome-scale map of the human protein-protein interaction network". Nature. 437 (7062): 1173–8. doi:10.1038/nature04209. PMID 16189514.
  • Mehrle A, Rosenfelder H, Schupp I; et al. (2006). "The LIFEdb database in 2006". Nucleic Acids Res. 34 (Database issue): D415–8. doi:10.1093/nar/gkj139. PMID 16381901.

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