RPL31

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Ribosomal protein L31
Identifiers
Symbols RPL31 ; MGC88191
External IDs HomoloGene37383
Orthologs

| | bgcolor="#C3FDB8" | Human | bgcolor="#C3FDB8" | Mouse |-

    | bgcolor="#C3FDB8" | Entrez 
    | bgcolor="#eeeeee" style="border-top:2px solid #dddddd; border-right:2px solid #dddddd"| 6160
    | bgcolor="#eeeeee" style="border-top:2px solid #dddddd; border-right:2px solid #dddddd"| na


|-

    | bgcolor="#C3FDB8" | Refseq
    | bgcolor="#eeeeee" style="border-top:2px solid #dddddd; border-right:2px solid #dddddd" | NM_000993 (mRNA)
NP_000984 (protein)
| bgcolor="#eeeeee" style="border-top:2px solid #dddddd; border-right:2px solid #dddddd" |na (mRNA)
na (protein)

|-

|-

    | bgcolor="#C3FDB8" | Pubmed search 
    | bgcolor="#eeeeee" style="border-top:2px solid #dddddd; border-right:2px solid #dddddd"| [1]
| bgcolor="#eeeeee" style="border-top:2px solid #dddddd; border-right:2px solid #dddddd"| na
Species Human Mouse
Entrez n/a n/a
Ensembl n/a n/a
UniProt n/a n/a
RefSeq (mRNA) n/a n/a
RefSeq (protein) n/a n/a
Location (UCSC) n/a n/a
PubMed search n/a n/a

Ribosomal protein L31, also known as RPL31, is a human gene.[1]

Ribosomes, the organelles that catalyze protein synthesis, consist of a small 40S subunit and a large 60S subunit. Together these subunits are composed of 4 RNA species and approximately 80 structurally distinct proteins. This gene encodes a ribosomal protein that is a component of the 60S subunit. The protein belongs to the L31E family of ribosomal proteins. It is located in the cytoplasm. Higher levels of expression of this gene in familial adenomatous polyps compared to matched normal tissues have been observed. As is typical for genes encoding ribosomal proteins, there are multiple processed pseudogenes of this gene dispersed through the genome.[1]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 "Entrez Gene: RPL31 ribosomal protein L31".

Further reading

  • Wool IG, Chan YL, Glück A (1996). "Structure and evolution of mammalian ribosomal proteins". Biochem. Cell Biol. 73 (11–12): 933–47. PMID 8722009.
  • Chester KA, Robson L, Begent RH; et al. (1990). "Identification of a human ribosomal protein mRNA with increased expression in colorectal tumours". Biochim. Biophys. Acta. 1009 (3): 297–300. PMID 2597680.
  • Nobori T, Hexdall LE, Carson DA (1989). "cDNA sequence of human ribosomal protein L31". Nucleic Acids Res. 17 (17): 7105. PMID 2780320.
  • Kato S, Sekine S, Oh SW; et al. (1995). "Construction of a human full-length cDNA bank". Gene. 150 (2): 243–50. PMID 7821789.
  • Bonaldo MF, Lennon G, Soares MB (1997). "Normalization and subtraction: two approaches to facilitate gene discovery". Genome Res. 6 (9): 791–806. PMID 8889548.
  • Kenmochi N, Kawaguchi T, Rozen S; et al. (1998). "A map of 75 human ribosomal protein genes". Genome Res. 8 (5): 509–23. PMID 9582194.
  • Yarden RI, Brody LC (2002). "Identification of proteins that interact with BRCA1 by Far-Western library screening". J. Cell. Biochem. 83 (4): 521–31. PMID 11746496.
  • Andersen JS, Lyon CE, Fox AH; et al. (2002). "Directed proteomic analysis of the human nucleolus". Curr. Biol. 12 (1): 1–11. PMID 11790298.
  • Yoshihama M, Uechi T, Asakawa S; et al. (2002). "The human ribosomal protein genes: sequencing and comparative analysis of 73 genes". Genome Res. 12 (3): 379–90. doi:10.1101/gr.214202. PMID 11875025.
  • Strausberg RL, Feingold EA, Grouse LH; et al. (2003). "Generation and initial analysis of more than 15,000 full-length human and mouse cDNA sequences". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99 (26): 16899–903. doi:10.1073/pnas.242603899. PMID 12477932.
  • Odintsova TI, Müller EC, Ivanov AV; et al. (2004). "Characterization and analysis of posttranslational modifications of the human large cytoplasmic ribosomal subunit proteins by mass spectrometry and Edman sequencing". J. Protein Chem. 22 (3): 249–58. PMID 12962325.
  • Brandenberger R, Wei H, Zhang S; et al. (2005). "Transcriptome characterization elucidates signaling networks that control human ES cell growth and differentiation". Nat. Biotechnol. 22 (6): 707–16. doi:10.1038/nbt971. PMID 15146197.
  • Gerhard DS, Wagner L, Feingold EA; et al. (2004). "The status, quality, and expansion of the NIH full-length cDNA project: the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC)". Genome Res. 14 (10B): 2121–7. doi:10.1101/gr.2596504. PMID 15489334.
  • Rush J, Moritz A, Lee KA; et al. (2005). "Immunoaffinity profiling of tyrosine phosphorylation in cancer cells". Nat. Biotechnol. 23 (1): 94–101. doi:10.1038/nbt1046. PMID 15592455.
  • Hillier LW, Graves TA, Fulton RS; et al. (2005). "Generation and annotation of the DNA sequences of human chromosomes 2 and 4". Nature. 434 (7034): 724–31. doi:10.1038/nature03466. PMID 15815621.
  • Rual JF, Venkatesan K, Hao T; et al. (2005). "Towards a proteome-scale map of the human protein-protein interaction network". Nature. 437 (7062): 1173–8. doi:10.1038/nature04209. PMID 16189514.
  • Kimura K, Wakamatsu A, Suzuki Y; et al. (2006). "Diversification of transcriptional modulation: large-scale identification and characterization of putative alternative promoters of human genes". Genome Res. 16 (1): 55–65. doi:10.1101/gr.4039406. PMID 16344560.
  • Olsen JV, Blagoev B, Gnad F; et al. (2006). "Global, in vivo, and site-specific phosphorylation dynamics in signaling networks". Cell. 127 (3): 635–48. doi:10.1016/j.cell.2006.09.026. PMID 17081983.
  • Ewing RM, Chu P, Elisma F; et al. (2007). "Large-scale mapping of human protein-protein interactions by mass spectrometry". Mol. Syst. Biol. 3: 89. doi:10.1038/msb4100134. PMID 17353931.

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