Polycystic ovary syndrome surgery

Jump to: navigation, search

Polycystic ovary syndrome Microchapters

Home

Patient Information

Overview

Historical Perspective

Classification

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Polycystic ovary syndrome from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Screening

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

Diagnostic Criteria

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

Electrocardiogram

X Ray

CT

MRI

Ultrasound

Other Imaging Findings

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Surgery

Primary Prevention

Secondary Prevention

Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy

Future or Investigational Therapies

Case Studies

Case #1

Polycystic ovary syndrome surgery On the Web

Most recent articles

Most cited articles

Review articles

CME Programs

Powerpoint slides

Images

American Roentgen Ray Society Images of Polycystic ovary syndrome surgery

All Images
X-rays
Echo & Ultrasound
CT Images
MRI

Ongoing Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse

NICE Guidance

FDA on Polycystic ovary syndrome surgery

CDC on Polycystic ovary syndrome surgery

Polycystic ovary syndrome surgery in the news

Blogs on Polycystic ovary syndrome surgery

Directions to Hospitals Treating Polycystic ovary syndrome

Risk calculators and risk factors for Polycystic ovary syndrome surgery

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Aditya Ganti M.B.B.S. [2]

Overview

Surgery is not considered a first-line therapy for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and it does not affect insulin resistance or obesity. Surgery is indicated in the treatment of PCOS only in patients desiring pregnancy in whom at least 1 year of conservative therapy has failed.

Surgery

Surgery is not considered first-line therapy for PCOS and it does not affect insulin resistance or obesity.[1][2][3]

Indication

Surgery is indicated in the treatment of PCOS only in patients desiring fertility in whom at least 1 year of conservative therapy has failed.

Surgical options

Ovarian drilling

  • Laparoscopic surgery that uses a laser or electrosurgical needle to puncture a number of small follicles visible on the surface of the ovary, which is presumably the source of hormone production.

Complications

References

  1. Badawy A, Elnashar A (2011). "Treatment options for polycystic ovary syndrome". Int J Womens Health. 3: 25–35. doi:10.2147/IJWH.S11304. PMC 3039006. PMID 21339935.
  2. Amer SA, Shamy T, James C, Yosef AH, Mohamed AA (2017). "The impact of laparoscopic ovarian drilling on AMH and ovarian reserve: a meta-analysis". Reproduction. 154 (1): R13–R21. doi:10.1530/REP-17-0063. PMID 28420801. Vancouver style error: initials (help)
  3. Hueb CK, Dias Júnior JA, Abrão MS, Filho EK (2015). "Drilling: medical indications and surgical technique". Rev Assoc Med Bras (1992). 61 (6): 530–5. doi:10.1590/1806-9282.61.06.530. PMID 26841163.



Linked-in.jpg