Polycystic ovary syndrome epidemiology and demographics

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1] ; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Aditya Ganti M.B.B.S. [2]

Overview

Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrine disorders in reproductive-age women, with a prevalence of 4-12% in the United States. Up to 10% of women are diagnosed with PCOS.

Epidemiology

Prevalence

  • Approximately 5% to 10% of women of reproductive age are affected.[1][2]
  • Prevalence among first-degree relatives of patients with PCOS is 25% to 50%, suggesting a strong inheritance of the syndrome; there is evidence for possible X-linked dominant transmission.

Demographics

Age

Polycystic ovary syndrome can appear anytime from menarche until menopause but generally, is seen around menarche and is diagnosed then or in early adulthood.[3]

Gender

Polycystic ovary syndrome occurs in approximately 1 in 10 women.

Race

There is no racial predilection for polycystic ovary syndrome.

References

  1. Dumesic DA, Oberfield SE, Stener-Victorin E, Marshall JC, Laven JS, Legro RS (2015). "Scientific Statement on the Diagnostic Criteria, Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, and Molecular Genetics of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome". Endocr. Rev. 36 (5): 487–525. doi:10.1210/er.2015-1018. PMC 4591526. PMID 26426951.
  2. Azziz R (2016). "Introduction: Determinants of polycystic ovary syndrome". Fertil. Steril. 106 (1): 4–5. doi:10.1016/j.fertnstert.2016.05.009. PMID 27238627.
  3. Lauritsen MP, Bentzen JG, Pinborg A, Loft A, Forman JL, Thuesen LL, Cohen A, Hougaard DM, Nyboe Andersen A (2014). "The prevalence of polycystic ovary syndrome in a normal population according to the Rotterdam criteria versus revised criteria including anti-Mullerian hormone". Hum. Reprod. 29 (4): 791–801. doi:10.1093/humrep/det469. PMID 24435776.



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