Pleasure

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Emotions

Acceptance
Affection
Anger
Annoyance
Apathy
Anxiety
Awe
Boredom
Compassion
Confusion
Contempt
Curiosity
Depression
Desire
Disgust
Disappointment
Doubt
Ecstasy
Empathy
Envy
Embarrassment
Euphoria
Fear
Frustration
Gratitude
Grief
Guilt
Happiness
Hatred
Hope
Horror
Hostility
Hysteria
Interest
Jealousy
Pity
Pride
Rage
Regret
Remorse
Revenge
Sadness
Shame
Suffering
Surprise
Wonder
Worry

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Pleasure is commonly conceptualized as a positive experience related to happiness, entertainment, enjoyment, ecstasy, and euphoria.

Pleasure has received much less scientific attention than pain, suffering or depression.[citation needed]

Activities

Pleasure can be brought about in different ways, depending on how every individual senses the feeling of pleasure.

People commonly feel this phenomenon through exercise, sexuality, music, drugs, writing, accomplishment, recognition, service, and any other imaginable activity; even pain.[citation needed] It also refers to "enjoyment" related to certain physical, sensual, emotional or mental experience.[citation needed]

Philosophy

Pleasure may also be defined, at least in some contexts, as being the reduction or absence of pain. Epicurus and his followers defined pleasure as the absence of pain.[citation needed]

The 19th Century German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer understood pleasure as a negative sensation, as it negates the usual existential condition, that of suffering.[citation needed]

Utilitarianism and New Hedonism philosophies both attempt to increase to the maximum the amount of pleasure and minimize the amount of pain.

Neurology

The Pleasure center is the set of brain structures, predominantly the nucleus accumbens, theorized to produce great pleasure when stimulated electrically. Some references state that the septum pellucidium is generally considered to be the pleasure center [1] while others mention the hypothalamus when referring to pleasure center for intracranial stimulation.[2]

Psychology

See also

Footnotes

  1. The Science of Love – Understanding Love and its Effects on Mind and Body. Prometheus Books. 1991. ISBN 0-87975-648-9. Unknown parameter |Author= ignored (|author= suggested) (help)
  2. Kandel ER, Schwartz JH, Jessell TM. Principles of Neural Science, 4th ed. McGraw-Hill, New York (2000). ISBN 0-8385-7701-6

References

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