Physical medicine and rehabilitation

Jump to: navigation, search

WikiDoc Resources for Physical medicine and rehabilitation

Articles

Most recent articles on Physical medicine and rehabilitation

Most cited articles on Physical medicine and rehabilitation

Review articles on Physical medicine and rehabilitation

Articles on Physical medicine and rehabilitation in N Eng J Med, Lancet, BMJ

Media

Powerpoint slides on Physical medicine and rehabilitation

Images of Physical medicine and rehabilitation

Photos of Physical medicine and rehabilitation

Podcasts & MP3s on Physical medicine and rehabilitation

Videos on Physical medicine and rehabilitation

Evidence Based Medicine

Cochrane Collaboration on Physical medicine and rehabilitation

Bandolier on Physical medicine and rehabilitation

TRIP on Physical medicine and rehabilitation

Clinical Trials

Ongoing Trials on Physical medicine and rehabilitation at Clinical Trials.gov

Trial results on Physical medicine and rehabilitation

Clinical Trials on Physical medicine and rehabilitation at Google

Guidelines / Policies / Govt

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse on Physical medicine and rehabilitation

NICE Guidance on Physical medicine and rehabilitation

NHS PRODIGY Guidance

FDA on Physical medicine and rehabilitation

CDC on Physical medicine and rehabilitation

Books

Books on Physical medicine and rehabilitation

News

Physical medicine and rehabilitation in the news

Be alerted to news on Physical medicine and rehabilitation

News trends on Physical medicine and rehabilitation

Commentary

Blogs on Physical medicine and rehabilitation

Definitions

Definitions of Physical medicine and rehabilitation

Patient Resources / Community

Patient resources on Physical medicine and rehabilitation

Discussion groups on Physical medicine and rehabilitation

Patient Handouts on Physical medicine and rehabilitation

Directions to Hospitals Treating Physical medicine and rehabilitation

Risk calculators and risk factors for Physical medicine and rehabilitation

Healthcare Provider Resources

Symptoms of Physical medicine and rehabilitation

Causes & Risk Factors for Physical medicine and rehabilitation

Diagnostic studies for Physical medicine and rehabilitation

Treatment of Physical medicine and rehabilitation

Continuing Medical Education (CME)

CME Programs on Physical medicine and rehabilitation

International

Physical medicine and rehabilitation en Espanol

Physical medicine and rehabilitation en Francais

Business

Physical medicine and rehabilitation in the Marketplace

Patents on Physical medicine and rehabilitation

Experimental / Informatics

List of terms related to Physical medicine and rehabilitation

Please Take Over This Page and Apply to be Editor-In-Chief for this topic: There can be one or more than one Editor-In-Chief. You may also apply to be an Associate Editor-In-Chief of one of the subtopics below. Please mail us [1] to indicate your interest in serving either as an Editor-In-Chief of the entire topic or as an Associate Editor-In-Chief for a subtopic. Please be sure to attach your CV and or biographical sketch.

Physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R), or physiatry, is a branch of medicine dealing with functional restoration of a person affected by physical disability. A physician who has completed training in this field is referred to as a physiatrist (fizz eye' a trist). In order to be a physiatrist in the United States, one must complete four years of medical school, one year of internship and three years of residency. Physiatrists specialize in restoring optimal function to people with injuries to the muscles, bones, tissues, and nervous system (such as stroke victims).[2]

Basic Medical Education

United States

Basic medical Education in the United States of America (USA) takes about four years but before medical education a three-year undergraduate course must be taken (on any subject, but best if scientific, chemical or biological). In the US, this is called college. Some students may even take four-years college courses.

Only then can a medical student take the four-year medical course. After the medical course, students must enter a one-year intenship (training). To qualify as a proper medical practitioner in the US, a student must now complete a residency. The lengths of a residency may range from three years to ten, determined by which specialty the student chooses.

United Kingdom

In the UNited Kingom, medical students could enter medical education straight after secondary school. They can choose how long they want the medical education to be, usually five to six years (depending on University or progress). Several universities now offer an accelerated medical course, and this takes four years (pre-clinical and clinical). After medical education, students will enter a Foundation phase (two years). The first year of the Foundation phase is called F1, and the student has already become a physician (entering F1 means entering paid employment). F1 practitioners are supervised, but F2 (year two of Foundation) practitioners may be unsupervised by a professional physician or trained medical supervisior.

After F2, a practitioner can choose to study general practice, or specialised practice. The physician can quit, or he can study further whilst worjing as an 'infant' physician. After the specialty or general studies, the physician qualifies as a proper medical practitioner.

Salaries afterwards range from several thousand per year to a million per year (the most common million-per-year being the specialty of private neurology).

The First Department of Physical Medicine was established at Mayo Clinic in 1936

History

The term 'Physiatry' was coined by Dr. Frank H. Krusen in 1938. The term was accepted by the American Medical Association in 1946. The field grew notably in response to the demand for sophisticated rehabilitation techniques for the large number of injured soldiers returning from World War II.

Scope of the field

Physical medicine and rehabilitation involves the management of disorders that alter the function and performance of the patient. Emphasis is placed on the optimization of function through the combined use of medications, physical modalities, and experiential training approaches. Electrodiagnostics are used to diagnose and provide prognosis for various neuromuscular disorders.

Common conditions that are treated by physiatrists include amputation, spinal cord injury, sports injury, stroke, musculoskletal pain syndromes such as low back pain, fibromyalgia and traumatic brain injury. Cardiopulmonary rehabilitation involves optimizing function in those afflicted with heart or lung disease. Chronic pain management is achieved through multidisciplinary approach involving psychologists, physical therapists, occupational therapists, and interventional procedures when indicated.

Philosophy

The major concern of the field is the ability of the person to function optimally within the limitations placed upon them by a disease process for which there is no known cure. The emphasis is not on the full restoration to the premorbid level of function, but rather the optimization of the quality of life for those who may not be able to achieve full restoration. A team approach to chronic conditions is emphasized, using transdisciplinary team meetings to coordinate care of the patients.

Pediatric physiatrists manage conditions such as cerebral palsy, spina bifida and Duchenne's muscular dystrophy

Subspecialty

Six formal sub-specializations are recognized by the field in the United States: pain medicine, pediatric rehabilitation, spinal cord injury medicine, neuromuscular medicine, sports medicine, and hospice and palliative medicine. Many in the field also subspecialize in areas of amputee care, musculoskeletal medicine, electrodiagnostics, traumatic brain injury (TBI), and cardiopulmonary rehabilitation.

Residencies in the United States

There are no clear rankings among PM&R residencies, but a list of the most commonly cited top programs in the United States would include

There are approximately 350 total positions available via the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) per year.

Notable Rehabilitation Hospitals in the United States

In addition to those associated with elite PM&R residency programs, notable US rehabilitation hospitals, many of which are teaching hospitals, include:


Popular textbooks

Two main textbooks often used by those in the specialty are Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation: Principles and Practice by Joel DeLisa and Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Medicine by Randall Braddom. Useful handbooks for medical students and residents include PM&R Secrets by Mark Young, Brian O'Young and Steven Stiens, and PM&R Pocketpedia by Howard Choi and colleagues.

Book Reference

  • Joel DeLisa (2004). Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation: Principles and Practice. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. ISBN 0-7817-4130-0.
  • Randall Braddom (2006). Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. WB Saunders. ISBN 978-1416026105.
  • Bryan J. O'Young, Mark A. Young, Steven A. Stiens (2002). Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Secrets. Hanley & Belfus. ISBN 1-56053-437-0.
  • Howard Choi, Ross Sugar, David E. Fish, Matthew Shatzer, Brian Krabak (2003). Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Pocketpedia. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. ISBN 0-7817-4433-4.

Journals

The two main journals of the PM&R field are Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Archives, which had been co-owned by the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (AAPM&R) and the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine (ACRM), will be solely owned by the Congress beginning January 2009. At that time, the Academy will launch a new journal: PM&R, The journal of injury, function and rehabilitation.[1]

Individual Residency Programs

Notes

References

External links

Organizations

Additional Resources

Rehabilitation hospital links


bn:শারীরিক চিকিৎসা ও পুনর্বাসন de:Physikalische und Rehabilitative Medizin eu:Errehabilitazio ne:भौतिक चिकित्सा र पूनर्स्थापना sl:Fiziatrija th:เวชศาสตร์ฟื้นฟู


Linked-in.jpg