Periodontitis medical therapy

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]

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Medical Therapy

Regular subgingival flushing with an anti-calculus composition can dissolve subgingival calculus (tartar) thus facilitating natural healing without surgery. This process is widely used for supragingival tartar via tartar-control toothpastes. Subgingival application of an anti-calculus composition requires a subgingival syringe or an oral irrigator.

One such anti-calculus composition (Periogen) contains Sodium Tripolyphosphate, Tetrapotassium Pyrophosphate, sodium bicarbonate, Citric Acid and sodium fluoride.

In the composition, tetrapotassium pyrophosphate (TKPP) is a cleaning agent designed to clear away biofilms in order to facilitate chemical access to calculus. Sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP) acts as the anti-calculus agent, activated by sodium fluoride (0.04%), providing a chelating action on the structure of the calculus.

Sodium bicarbonate and citric acid are product activators which assist in dissolving the composition in water for periodontal delivery via a subgingival syringe or oral irrigator with a periodontal tip.

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