Myeloproliferative neoplasm physical examination

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Myeloproliferative Neoplasm Microchapters

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1] Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Mohamad Alkateb, MBBCh [2] Shyam Patel [3]

Overview

Patients with myeloproliferative neoplasm are usually well-appearing. Physical examination of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia is usually remarkable for skin bruising, fever, splenomegaly, and lymphadenopathy.

Physical Examination

Common physical examination findings associated with myeloproliferative neoplasm include:[1][2][3][4]

Appearance of the Patient

  • Patients are usually well-appearing at an early time point in the disease and ill-appearing at a later time point in the disease.

Vital Signs

Skin

HEENT

  • Decreased vision acuity
  • Mucosal pallor

Neck

Lungs

Chest

Abdomen

Genitourinary

References

  1. Agarwal MB, Malhotra H, Chakrabarti P, Varma N, Mathews V, Bhattacharyya J; et al. (2015). "Myeloproliferative neoplasms working group consensus recommendations for diagnosis and management of primary myelofibrosis, polycythemia vera, and essential thrombocythemia". Indian J Med Paediatr Oncol. 36 (1): 3–16. doi:10.4103/0971-5851.151770. PMC 4363847. PMID 25810569.
  2. Tefferi A (2006). "Classification, diagnosis and management of myeloproliferative disorders in the JAK2V617F era". Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program: 240–245. PMID 17124067.
  3. Canadian Cancer Society.2015.http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-type/leukemia-chronic-myelogenous-cml/signs-and-symptoms/?region=ab
  4. Bittencourt RI, Vassallo J, Chauffaille Mde L, Xavier SG, Pagnano KB, Nascimento AC; et al. (2012). "Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms". Rev Bras Hematol Hemoter. 34 (2): 140–9. doi:10.5581/1516-8484.20120034. PMC 3459391. PMID 23049404.

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