Myeloproliferative neoplasm other diagnostic studies

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1] Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Mohamad Alkateb, MBBCh [2] Shyam Patel [3]

Overview

Other diagnostic studies for myeloproliferative neoplasm include bone marrow aspiration and trephine biopsy, erythropoietin level, lumbar puncture, and lymph node biopsy.

Other diagnostic studies

Other diagnostic studies for myeloproliferative neoplasm include:[1][2]

  • Bone marrow aspiration and trephine biopsy: This is an invasive diagnostic procedure that is sometimes required for the diagnosis of myeloproliferative neoplasm. Bone marrow biopsy usually shows high proportions of leukocytes, erythrocytes, and thrombocytes. This is referred to as panmyelosis or hypercellularity. Cellularity normally decreases with age, but the cellularity will relatively high in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasm. The findings on a bone marrow biopsy constitute one of the major diagnostic criteria for various subtypes of myeloproliferative neoplasm in the 2016 WHO classification.[3]
  • Erythropoietin level: Erythropoietin level is usually low in polycythemia vera, one of the subtypes of myeloproliferative neoplasm. This is because polycythemia vera is characterized by autonomous production of red blood cells in an erythropoietin-independent manner.
  • Lumbar puncture: This is used to detect any metastasis to the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), which is rare.
  • Lymph node biopsy: This is used to obtain a diagnostic specimen, or to detect and/or determine the type of leukemic cells if leukemia is present.

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References

  1. Canadian Cancer Society.2015.http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-type/leukemia-chronic-myelogenous-cml/diagnosis/?region=ab
  2. Levene, Malcolm I.; Lewis, S. M.; Bain, Barbara J.; Imelda Bates. Dacie & Lewis Practical Haematology. London: W B Saunders. p. 586. ISBN 0-443-06377-X.
  3. Arber DA, Orazi A, Hasserjian R, Thiele J, Borowitz MJ, Le Beau MM; et al. (2016). "The 2016 revision to the World Health Organization classification of myeloid neoplasms and acute leukemia". Blood. 127 (20): 2391–405. doi:10.1182/blood-2016-03-643544. PMID 27069254.
  4. 4.0 4.1 National Cancer Institute. Physician Data Query Database 2015.http://www.cancer.gov/types/leukemia/patient/cml-treatment-pdq

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