Mumps risk factors

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-In-Chief: Lakshmi Gopalakrishnan, M.B.B.S. [2]; Nate Michalak, B.A.

Overview

Risk factors for mumps include: unvaccinated individuals who do not have evidence of immunity, belonging to the age group 2-12 years, international travel, especially to countries without mumps vaccination programs, working or living in close proximity to individual(s) infected with Rubulavirus, and being in states of immunodeficiency.

Risk Factors

  • Unvaccinated individuals who do not have evidence of immunity.
  • Acceptable presumptive evidence of immunity to mumps includes: documented administration of two doses of live mumps virus vaccine at least 28 days apart, on or after the first birthday; laboratory evidence of immunity; birth before 1957; or documentation of physician-diagnosed mumps.
  • Individuals with only 1 dose of the MMR or MMRV vaccine are at higher risk than those with 2 doses.
  • Individuals with 2 doses of the MMR or MMRV vaccine are still at risk since the vaccines are not 100% effective at preventing mumps.
  • Children between 2 and 12 years old are at the highest risk for contracting mumps.
  • International travel, especially to countries without mumps vaccination programs.[1]
  • Working or living in close proximity to individual(s) infected with Rubulavirus (e.g. classrooms, college dormatories).
  • Individuals in states of immunodeficiency.[2]

References

  1. Galazka AM, Robertson SE, Kraigher A (1999). "Mumps and mumps vaccine: a global review". Bull World Health Organ. 77 (1): 3–14. PMC 2557572. PMID 10063655.
  2. Mumps. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (May 29, 2015). http://www.cdc.gov/mumps/index.html Accessed March 09, 2016.

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