Mumps diagnostic criteria

Jump to: navigation, search

Mumps Microchapters

Home

Patient Information

Overview

Historical Perspective

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Mumps from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

Diagnostic Criteria

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

CT

Ultrasound

Other Imaging Findings

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Primary Prevention

Secondary Prevention

Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy

Future or Investigational Therapies

Case Studies

Case #1

Mumps diagnostic criteria On the Web

Most recent articles

Most cited articles

Review articles

CME Programs

Powerpoint slides

Images

American Roentgen Ray Society Images of Mumps diagnostic criteria

All Images
X-rays
Echo & Ultrasound
CT Images
MRI

Ongoing Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse

NICE Guidance

FDA on Mumps diagnostic criteria

CDC on Mumps diagnostic criteria

Mumps diagnostic criteria in the news

Blogs on Mumps diagnostic criteria

Directions to Hospitals Treating Mumps

Risk calculators and risk factors for Mumps diagnostic criteria

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1] Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: ; Nate Michalak, B.A.

Overview

Suspected mumps involves parotitis, orchitis, or oophoritis unexplained by another diagnosis OR a positive lab result with no mumps clinical symptoms. Probable mumps involves parotitis or other salivary gland swelling lasting at least 2 days, or orchitis or oophoritis unexplained by another more likely diagnosis, in a person with a positive test for serum anti-mumps immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibody OR person with epidemiologic linkage to another probable or confirmed case or linkage to a group/community defined by public health during an outbreak of mumps. Confirmed mumps involves positive mumps laboratory confirmation for mumps virus with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) or culture in a patient any of the following symptoms: acute parotitis or other salivary gland swelling, lasting at least 2 days, aseptic meningitis, encephalitis, hearing loss, orchitis, oophoritis, mastitis, pancreatitis.

Diagnostic Criteria

In collaboration with the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE), the CDC provides the following case definition for mumps:[1]

Suspected

OR
  • A positive lab result with no mumps clinical symptoms (with or without epidemiological-linkage to a confirmed or probable case).

Probable

  • Acute parotitis or other salivary gland swelling lasting at least 2 days, or orchitis or oophoritis unexplained by another more likely diagnosis, in:
  • A person with a positive test for serum anti-mumps immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibody
OR
  • A person with epidemiologic linkage to another probable or confirmed case or linkage to a group/community defined by public health during an outbreak of mumps.

Confirmed

References

  1. National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2012 Case Definition). http://wwwn.cdc.gov/nndss/conditions/mumps/case-definition/2012/ Accessed March 07, 2016.

Linked-in.jpg