Mitral regurgitation history and symptoms

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Cafer Zorkun, M.D., Ph.D. [2]; Varun Kumar, M.B.B.S.; Lakshmi Gopalakrishnan, M.B.B.S.; Rim Halaby, M.D. [3]: Yamuna Kondapally, M.B.B.S[4]

Overview

Acute and decompensated mitral regurgitation (MR) is associated with symptoms of congestive heart failure including dyspnea, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea, orthopnea, and exercise intolerance. Individuals with chronic compensated MR may be asymptomatic, with a normal exercise tolerance and no evidence of heart failure.

History and Symptoms

History

Symptoms

Acute or Decompensated Mitral Regurgitation

Chronic Compensated Mitral Regurgitation

  • Individuals with chronic compensated MR may be asymptomatic, with a normal exercise tolerance and no evidence of heart failure. These individuals may be sensitive to small shifts in their intravascular volume status, and are prone to develop volume overload (congestive heart failure).
  • Palpitations might occur in these patients due to the dilatation of the left atrium.[4][5][6]

References

  1. Enriquez-Sarano M, Akins CW, Vahanian A (2009). "Mitral regurgitation". Lancet. 373 (9672): 1382–94. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(09)60692-9. PMID 19356795.
  2. Birnbaum Y, Chamoun AJ, Conti VR, Uretsky BF (2002). "Mitral regurgitation following acute myocardial infarction". Coron Artery Dis. 13 (6): 337–44. PMID 12436029.
  3. Iung B (2003). "Management of ischaemic mitral regurgitation". Heart. 89 (4): 459–64. PMC 1769268. PMID 12639884.
  4. Madesis A, Tsakiridis K, Zarogoulidis P, Katsikogiannis N, Machairiotis N, Kougioumtzi I; et al. (2014). "Review of mitral valve insufficiency: repair or replacement". J Thorac Dis. 6 Suppl 1: S39–51. doi:10.3978/j.issn.2072-1439.2013.10.20. PMC 3966162. PMID 24672698.
  5. Sparano DM, Ward RP (2012). "Management of asymptomatic, severe mitral regurgitation". Curr Treat Options Cardiovasc Med. 14 (6): 575–83. doi:10.1007/s11936-012-0207-4. PMID 22961273.
  6. Mokadam NA, Stout KK, Verrier ED (2011). "Management of acute regurgitation in left-sided cardiac valves". Tex Heart Inst J. 38 (1): 9–19. PMC 3060740. PMID 21423463.



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