Melanoma other imaging findings

Jump to: navigation, search

Melanoma Microchapters

Home

Patient Information

Overview

Historical Perspective

Classification

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Melanoma from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Screening

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

Diagnostic Study of Choice

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

Electrocardiogram

X-ray

Echocardiography and Ultrasound

CT scan

MRI

Other Imaging Findings

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Surgery

Primary Prevention

Secondary Prevention

Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy

Future or Investigational Therapies

Case Studies

Case #1

Melanoma other imaging findings On the Web

Most recent articles

Most cited articles

Review articles

CME Programs

Powerpoint slides

Images

American Roentgen Ray Society Images of Melanoma other imaging findings

All Images
X-rays
Echo & Ultrasound
CT Images
MRI

Ongoing Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse

NICE Guidance

FDA on Melanoma other imaging findings

CDC on Melanoma other imaging findings

Melanoma other imaging findings in the news

Blogs on Melanoma other imaging findings

Directions to Hospitals Treating Melanoma

Risk calculators and risk factors for Melanoma other imaging findings

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1] Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Yazan Daaboul, M.D.; Serge Korjian M.D.Sabawoon Mirwais, M.B.B.S, M.D.[2]

Overview

Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), positron emission tomography (PET) scan, and Integrated 18F-FDG PET/CT can be used during the diagnostic process of melanoma. DCE-MRI has the potential to be an in vivo imaging technique that can predict and isolate the patient group prone to metastatic disease. Integrated 18F-FDG PET/CT is useful in disease staging, therapy assessment, and determining prognosis. Positron emission tomography (PET) scan can help in diagnosing metastatic lesions.

Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

  • Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI can reveal different contrast enhancement patterns in relation to microvasculature and the expression of angiogenetic factor such as vascular endothelial growth factor.[1]
  • It can differentiate the tumor characterization between metastatic and non-metastatic melanoma by the Ktrans value.[2][1]
  • DCE-MRI has the potential to be an in vivo imaging technique that can predict and isolate the patient group prone to metastatic disease.[2]

Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Scan

  • Chest PET scan may be considered for diagnosis of metastatic lesions in the following conditions:[3]
  • For patients who have been diagnosed with stage IA-IV melanoma
  • For secondary prevention of melanoma among patients who were previously diagnosed with Stage IIB-IV melanoma (annually for 5 years)

Integrated 18F-FDG PET/CT

  • Integrated 18F-FDG PET/CT is useful in disease staging, therapy assessment, and determining prognosis.[4]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Ovrebø KM, Ellingsen C, Galappathi K, Rofstad EK (May 2012). "Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the metastatic potential of melanoma xenografts". Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 83 (1): e121–7. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2011.12.019. PMID 22381901.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Wei W, Jia G, von Tengg-Kobligk H, Heverhagen JT, Abdel-Rahman M, Wei L, Christoforidis JB, Davidorf F, Knopp MV (2017). "Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Ocular Melanoma as a Tool to Predict Metastatic Potential". J Comput Assist Tomogr. 41 (5): 823–827. doi:10.1097/RCT.0000000000000598. PMID 28448404.
  3. Coit DG, Andtbacka R, Anker CJ, Bichakjian CK, Carson WE, Daud A; et al. (2013). "Melanoma, version 2.2013: featured updates to the NCCN guidelines". J Natl Compr Canc Netw. 11 (4): 395–407. PMID 23584343.
  4. Perng P, Marcus C, Subramaniam RM (August 2015). "(18)F-FDG PET/CT and Melanoma: Staging, Immune Modulation and Mutation-Targeted Therapy Assessment, and Prognosis". AJR Am J Roentgenol. 205 (2): 259–70. doi:10.2214/AJR.14.13575. PMID 26204273.

Linked-in.jpg