MYLIP

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Identifiers
Aliases
External IDsGeneCards: [1]
Orthologs
SpeciesHumanMouse
Entrez
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RefSeq (mRNA)

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RefSeq (protein)

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Myosin regulatory light chain interacting protein, also known as MYLIP, is a protein that in humans is encoded by the MYLIP gene.[1]

MYLIP is also known as IDOL "Inducible Degrader of the LDL receptor" based on its involvement in cholesterol regulation.[2][3] The expression of IDOL is induced by the sterol-activated liver X receptor.

Increased Degradation of LDL Receptor Protein (IDOL) is a ubiquitin ligase that ubiquinates LDL receptors in endosomes and directs the receptors to the lysosomal compartment for degradation. IDOL is transcriptionally up-regulated by LXR/RXR in response to an increase in intracellular cholesterol.[4] Pharmacologic inhibition of IDOL could reduce plasma LDL cholesterol by increasing plasma LDL receptor density.

Function

The ERM protein family members ezrin, radixin, and moesin are cytoskeletal effector proteins linking actin to membrane-bound proteins at the cell surface. Myosin regulatory light chain interacting protein (MYLIP) is a novel ERM-like protein that interacts with myosin regulatory light chain and inhibits neurite outgrowth.[1]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 "Entrez Gene: MYLIP myosin regulatory light chain interacting protein".
  2. Zelcer N, Hong C, Boyadjian R, Tontonoz P (July 2009). "LXR regulates cholesterol uptake through Idol-dependent ubiquitination of the LDL receptor". Science. 325 (5936): 100–4. doi:10.1126/science.1168974. PMC 2777523. PMID 19520913.
  3. Lindholm D, Bornhauser BC, Korhonen L (November 2009). "Mylip makes an Idol turn into regulation of LDL receptor". Cell. Mol. Life Sci. 66 (21): 3399–402. doi:10.1007/s00018-009-0127-y. PMID 19688294.
  4. Sawamura, T. (2009). "New Idol for cholesterol reduction?". Clin. Chem. 55 (12): 2082–2084. doi:10.1373/clinchem.2009.134023.

Further reading




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