Lateral meniscus

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Lateral meniscus
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Head of right tibia seen from above, showing menisci and attachments of ligaments.
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Left knee-joint from behind, showing interior ligaments.
Latin meniscus lateralis
Gray's subject #93 343

The lateral meniscus (external semilunar fibrocartilage) is nearly circular and covers a larger portion of the articular surface than the medial meniscus.

It is grooved laterally for the tendon of the Popliteus, which separates it from the fibular collateral ligament.

Its anterior end is attached in front of the intercondyloid eminence of the tibia, lateral to, and behind, the anterior cruciate ligament, with which it blends; the posterior end is attached behind the intercondyloid eminence of the tibia and in front of the posterior end of the medial meniscus.

The anterior attachment of the lateral meniscus is twisted on itself so that its free margin looks backward and upward, its anterior end resting on a sloping shelf of bone on the front of the lateral process of the intercondyloid eminence.

Close to its posterior attachment it sends off a strong fasciculus, the ligament of Wrisberg, which passes upward and medialward, to be inserted into the medial condyle of the femur, immediately behind the attachment of the posterior cruciate ligament.

Occasionally a small fasciculus passes forward to be inserted into the lateral part of the anterior cruciate ligament.

The lateral meniscus gives off from its anterior convex margin a fasciculus which forms the transverse ligament.

See also

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External links

This article was originally based on an entry from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy. As such, some of the information contained herein may be outdated. Please edit the article if this is the case, and feel free to remove this notice when it is no longer relevant.


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