Laparotomy

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Intervention:
Laparotomy
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Abdominal cavity
ICD-10 code:
ICD-9 code: 54.1
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List of terms related to Laparotomy

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]

Overview

A laparotomy is a surgical procedure involving an incision through the abdominal wall to gain access into the abdominal cavity. It is also known as coeliotomy.

Terminology

In diagnostic laparotomy (most often referred to as an exploratory laparotomy), the nature of the disease is unknown, and laparotomy is deemed the best way to identify the cause.

In therapeutic laparotomy, a cause has been identified (e.g. peptic ulcer, colon cancer) and laparotomy is required for its therapy.

Usually, only exploratory laparotomy is referred to as a surgical operation by itself; and when a specific operation is already planned, laparotomy is considered merely the first step of the procedure.

Spaces accessed

Depending on incision placement, it may give access to any abdominal organ or space, and is the first step in any major diagnostic or therapeutic surgical procedure of these organs, which include:

Types of incisions

Midline

The most common incision for laparotomy is the midline incision, a vertical incision which follows the linea alba.

Midline incisions are particularly favoured in diagnostic laparotomy, as they allow wide access to most of the abdominal cavity.

Other

Other common laparotomy incisions include:

  • the Davis or Rockey-Davis "muscle-splitting" right lower quadrant incision for appendectomy;[3]
  • Lumbotomy consists of a lumbar incision which permits access to the kidneys (which are retroperitoneal) without entering the peritoneal cavity. It is typically used only for benign renal lesions. It has also been proposed for surgery of the upper urological tract.[7]

Related procedures

A related procedure is laparoscopy, where cameras and other instruments are inserted into the peritoneal cavity via small holes in the abdomen. For example, an appendectomy can be done either by a laparotomy or by a laparoscopic approach.

References

  1. synd/1010 at Who Named It
  2. "Incisions". Retrieved 2007-11-22. 
  3. i_05/12447110 at Dorland's Medical Dictionary
  4. synd/2500 at Who Named It
  5. H. J. Pfannenstiel. Ueber die Vortheile des suprasymphysären Fascienquerschnitts für die gynäkologischen Koeliotomien. (Volkmann’s) Sammlung klinischer Vorträge, Leipzig, 1900, n F. 268 (Gynäk. Nr. 97), 1735-1756.
  6. Giacalone PL, Daures JP, Vignal J, Herisson C, Hedon B, Laffargue F (2002). "Pfannenstiel versus Maylard incision for cesarean delivery: A randomized controlled trial". Obstetrics and gynecology. 99 (5 Pt 1): 745–50. PMID 11978282. 
  7. Bajpai M, Kumar A, Gupta AK, Pawar DK (2004). "Lumbotomy approach for upper urological tract surgery in children--an analysis of 68 consecutive lumbotomies". European journal of pediatric surgery : official journal of Austrian Association of Pediatric Surgery ... [et al] = Zeitschrift für Kinderchirurgie. 14 (3): 163–7. PMID 15211405. doi:10.1055/s-2004-820903. 

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