LILRB3

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External IDsGeneCards: [1]
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SpeciesHumanMouse
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Leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor subfamily B member 3 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the LILRB3 gene.[1][2][3]

This gene is a member of the leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor (LIR) family, which is found in a gene cluster at chromosomal region 19q13.4. The encoded protein belongs to the subfamily B class of LIR receptors which contain two or four extracellular immunoglobulin domains, a transmembrane domain, and two to four cytoplasmic immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs). The receptor is expressed on immune cells where it binds to MHC class I molecules on antigen-presenting cells and transduces a negative signal that inhibits stimulation of an immune response. It is thought to control inflammatory responses and cytotoxicity to help focus the immune response and limit autoreactivity. Multiple transcript variants encoding different isoforms have been found for this gene.[3]

See also

References

  1. Arm JP, Nwankwo C, Austen KF (Sep 1997). "Molecular identification of a novel family of human Ig superfamily members that possess immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motifs and homology to the mouse gp49B1 inhibitory receptor". J Immunol. 159 (5): 2342–9. PMID 9278324.
  2. Colonna M, Navarro F, Bellon T, Llano M, Garcia P, Samaridis J, Angman L, Cella M, Lopez-Botet M (Dec 1997). "A common inhibitory receptor for major histocompatibility complex class I molecules on human lymphoid and myelomonocytic cells". J Exp Med. 186 (11): 1809–18. doi:10.1084/jem.186.11.1809. PMC 2199153. PMID 9382880.
  3. 3.0 3.1 "Entrez Gene: LILRB3 leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor, subfamily B (with TM and ITIM domains), member 3".

Further reading

External links

This article incorporates text from the United States National Library of Medicine, which is in the public domain.



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