LILRA2

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Identifiers
Aliases
External IDsGeneCards: [1]
Orthologs
SpeciesHumanMouse
Entrez
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RefSeq (mRNA)

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RefSeq (protein)

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Leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor subfamily A member 2 (LILRA2, CD85H, ILT1) is a protein that in humans is encoded by the LILRA2 gene.[1][2][3]

Leukocyte Ig-like receptors (LIRs) are a family of immunoreceptors expressed predominantly on monocytes and B cells and at lower levels on dendritic cells and natural killer (NK) cells. All LIRs in subfamily B have an inhibitory function (see, e.g., LILRB1, MIM 604811). LIRs in subfamily A, with short cytoplasmic domains lacking an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) and with transmembrane regions containing a charged arginine residue, may initiate stimulatory cascades. One member of subfamily A (LILRA3; MIM 604818) lacks a transmembrane region and is presumed to be a soluble receptor.[supplied by OMIM][3]

Function

LILRA2 senses microbially cleaved immunoglobulin to activate human myeloid cells.[4]

See also

References

  1. Samaridis J, Colonna M (Apr 1997). "Cloning of novel immunoglobulin superfamily receptors expressed on human myeloid and lymphoid cells: structural evidence for new stimulatory and inhibitory pathways". Eur J Immunol. 27 (3): 660–5. doi:10.1002/eji.1830270313. PMID 9079806.
  2. Borges L, Hsu ML, Fanger N, Kubin M, Cosman D (Apr 1998). "A family of human lymphoid and myeloid Ig-like receptors, some of which bind to MHC class I molecules". J Immunol. 159 (11): 5192–6. PMID 9548455.
  3. 3.0 3.1 "Entrez Gene: LILRA2 leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor, subfamily A (with TM domain), member 2".
  4. Hirayasu K, Saito F, Suenaga T, Shida K, Arase N, Oikawa K, Yamaoka T, Murota H, Chibana H, Nagai H, Nakamura Y, Katayama I, Colonna M, Arase H (Apr 2016). "LILRA2 is an innate immune sensor for microbially cleaved immunoglobulins". Nature Microbiology. 1 (6): 16054. doi:10.1038/NMICROBIOL.2016.54.

Further reading

External links

This article incorporates text from the United States National Library of Medicine, which is in the public domain.



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