IL3RA

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Identifiers
Aliases
External IDsGeneCards: [1]
Orthologs
SpeciesHumanMouse
Entrez
Ensembl
UniProt
RefSeq (mRNA)

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RefSeq (protein)

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Location (UCSC)n/an/a
PubMed searchn/an/a
Wikidata
View/Edit Human

Interleukin 3 receptor, alpha (low affinity) (IL3RA), also known as CD123 (Cluster of Differentiation 123), is a human gene.[1]

Function

The protein encoded by this gene is an interleukin 3 specific subunit of a heterodimeric cytokine receptor. The receptor is composed of a ligand specific alpha subunit and a signal transducing beta subunit shared by the receptors for interleukin 3 (IL3), colony stimulating factor 2 (CSF2/GM-CSF), and interleukin 5 (IL5). The binding of this protein to IL3 depends on the beta subunit. The beta subunit is activated by the ligand binding, and is required for the biological activities of IL3. This gene and the gene encoding the colony stimulating factor 2 receptor alpha chain (CSF2RA) form a cytokine receptor gene cluster in a X-Y pseudoautosomal region on chromosomes X or Y.[1]

Interactions

IL3RA has been shown to interact with Interleukin 3.[2][3]

See also

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 "Entrez Gene: IL3RA interleukin 3 receptor, alpha (low affinity)".
  2. Stomski FC, Sun Q, Bagley CJ, Woodcock J, Goodall G, Andrews RK, Berndt MC, Lopez AF (June 1996). "Human interleukin-3 (IL-3) induces disulfide-linked IL-3 receptor alpha- and beta-chain heterodimerization, which is required for receptor activation but not high-affinity binding". Mol. Cell. Biol. 16 (6): 3035–46. PMC 231298. PMID 8649415.
  3. Woodcock JM, Zacharakis B, Plaetinck G, Bagley CJ, Qiyu S, Hercus TR, Tavernier J, Lopez AF (November 1994). "Three residues in the common beta chain of the human GM-CSF, IL-3 and IL-5 receptors are essential for GM-CSF and IL-5 but not IL-3 high affinity binding and interact with Glu21 of GM-CSF". EMBO J. 13 (21): 5176–85. PMC 395466. PMID 7957082.

Further reading

External links

This article incorporates text from the United States National Library of Medicine, which is in the public domain.



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