Humeroradial joint

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Humeroradial joint
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Left elbow-joint, showing anterior and ulnar collateral ligaments.
Latin articulatio humeroradialis
Gray's subject #84 321
Dorlands/Elsevier a_64/12161255

The humeroradial joint, the joint between the head of the radius and the capitulum of the humerus, is an arthrodial joint.

The bony surfaces would of themselves constitute an enarthrosis and allow movement in all directions, were it not for the annular ligament, by which the head of the radius is bound to the radial notch of the ulna, and which prevents any separation of the two bones laterally.

It is to the same ligament that the head of the radius owes its security from dislocation, which would otherwise tend to occur, from the shallowness of the cup-like surface on the head of the radius.

In fact, but for this ligament, the tendon of the Biceps brachii would be liable to pull the head of the radius out of the joint.

The head of the radius is not in complete contact with the capitulum of the humerus in all positions of the joint.

The capitulum occupies only the anterior and inferior surfaces of the lower end of the humerus, so that in complete extension a part of the radial head can be plainly felt projecting at the back of the articulation.

In full flexion the movement of the radial head is hampered by the compression of the surrounding soft parts, so that the freest rotatory movement of the radius on the humerus (pronation and supination) takes place in semiflexion, in which position the two articular surfaces are in most intimate contact.

Flexion and extension of the elbow-joint are limited by the tension of the structures on the front and back of the joint; the limitation of flexion is also aided by the soft structures of the arm and forearm coming into contact.

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This article was originally based on an entry from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy. As such, some of the information contained herein may be outdated. Please edit the article if this is the case, and feel free to remove this notice when it is no longer relevant.


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