Hemochromatosis surgery

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Sunny Kumar MD [2]

Overview

Surgery does not play role in treatment however liver biopsy is obtained in case of evaluations of diagnosis of few cases of iron over load conditions.

Surgery

Early diagnosis is important because the late effects of iron accumulation can be wholly prevented by periodic phlebotomies (by venesection) comparable in volume to blood donations.[1] Treatment is initiated when ferritin levels reach 300 micrograms per litre (or 200 in nonpregnant premenopausal women).[2]

Every bag of blood ml) contains 200-250 milligrams of iron. Phlebotomy (or bloodletting) is usually done at a weekly interval until ferritin levels are less than 20 nanograms per millilitre. After that, 1-4 donations per year are usually needed to maintain iron balance.

References

  1. Hemochromatosis - Treatment
  2. Hankins JS, McCarville MB, Loeffler RB, Smeltzer MP, Onciu M, Hoffer FA; et al. (2009). "R2* magnetic resonance imaging of the liver in patients with iron overload.". Blood. 113 (20): 4853–5. PMC 2686136Freely accessible. PMID 19264677. doi:10.1182/blood-2008-12-191643. 



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