Gingerol

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Gingerol
Gingerol
Chemical name (S)-5-hydroxy-1-(4-hydroxy-3-
methoxyphenyl)-3-decanone
Chemical formula C17H26O4
Molecular mass 294.38 g/mol
CAS number [23513-14-6]
Density ? g/cm3
Melting point 30-32 °C
Boiling point ? °C
SMILES O=C(C[C@@H](O)CCCCC)
CCC1=CC=C(O)C(OC)=C1
Disclaimer and references

Gingerol, or sometimes [6]-gingerol, is the active constituent of fresh ginger. Chemically, gingerol is a relative of capsaicin, the compound that gives chile peppers their spiciness. It is normally found as a pungent yellow oil, but also can form a low-melting crystalline solid.

Cooking ginger transforms gingerol into zingerone, which is less pungent and has a spicy-sweet aroma.

Gingerol may reduce nausea caused by motion sickness or pregnancy[1] and may also relieve migraine.[2]

References

  1. Ernst, E. (2000). "Efficacy of ginger for nausea and vomiting: a systematic review of randomized clinical trials" (PDF). British Journal of Anaesthesia. 84 (3): 367–371. Retrieved 2006-09-06. Unknown parameter |coauthors= ignored (help)
  2. Mustafa, T. (1990). "Ginger (Zingiber officinale) in Migraine Headache". Journal of Ethnopharmacology. 29: 267–273. Unknown parameter |coauthors= ignored (help)

External links

de:Gingerol




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