Gastroesophageal reflux disease natural history, complications and prognosis

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Ahmed Elsaiey, MBBCH [2]

Overview

If left untreated, 20% of patients with GERD may progress to develop esophageal stricture due to excessive acid in the lower esophagus. Complications of GERD include barrett's esophagus, erosive esophagitis, esophageal ulcer, and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Prognosis of GERD is good with the appropriate treatment.

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Natural History

Complication

Complications that can develop as a result of GERD include the following:[2]

Prognosis

  • The majority of people respond to nonsurgical measures, with lifestyle changes and medications. However, many patients need to continue to take drugs to control their symptoms.

References

  1. Sonnenberg A, El-Serag HB (1999). "Clinical epidemiology and natural history of gastroesophageal reflux disease.". Yale J Biol Med. 72 (2-3): 81–92. PMC 2579001Freely accessible. PMID 10780569. 
  2. El-Serag HB, Graham DY, Satia JA, Rabeneck L (2005). "Obesity is an independent risk factor for GERD symptoms and erosive esophagitis.". Am J Gastroenterol. 100 (6): 1243–50. PMID 15929752. doi:10.1111/j.1572-0241.2005.41703.x. 

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