Familial amyloidosis physical examination

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Farima Kahe M.D. [2]Fahimeh Shojaei, M.D.

Overview

Physical examination of patients with familial amyloidosis is usually remarkable for hypertension, tachycardia, waxy thickening, easy bruising, purpura, macroglossia, parotid gland and submandibular gland enlargement, edema, numbness, hepatomegaly and paresthesia.

Physical Examination

Physical examination of patients with familial amyloidosis is usually remarkable for hypertension, tachycardia, waxy thickening, easy bruising, purpura, macroglossia, parotid gland and submandibular gland enlargement, edema, numbness, hepatomegaly and paresthesia.[1][2][3][4]

Appearance of the Patient

  • Patients with familial amyloidosis usually appear normal.

Vital signs

Skin

HEENT

Neck

  • Neck examination of patients with familial amyloidosis is usually normal.

Lungs

Heart

Abdomen

Back

  • Back examination of patients with familial amyloidosis is usually normal.

Genitourinary

  • Genitourinary examination of patients with familial amyloidosis is usually normal.

Neuromuscular

Extremities

References

  1. Wechalekar AD, Gillmore JD, Hawkins PN (June 2016). "Systemic amyloidosis". Lancet. 387 (10038): 2641–2654. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(15)01274-X. PMID 26719234.
  2. Pribitkin E, Friedman O, O'Hara B, Cunnane MF, Levi D, Rosen M, Keane WM, Sataloff RT (December 2003). "Amyloidosis of the upper aerodigestive tract". Laryngoscope. 113 (12): 2095–101. doi:10.1097/00005537-200312000-00007. PMID 14660909.
  3. Shin SC, Robinson-Papp J (2012). "Amyloid neuropathies". Mt. Sinai J. Med. 79 (6): 733–48. doi:10.1002/msj.21352. PMC 3531896. PMID 23239211.
  4. Sandgren O (1995). "Ocular amyloidosis, with special reference to the hereditary forms with vitreous involvement". Surv Ophthalmol. 40 (3): 173–96. doi:10.1016/s0039-6257(95)80025-5. PMID 8599154.

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