Elevated transaminases

Jump to: navigation, search
Elevated transaminases
ICD-10 R74.0
ICD-9 790.4
DiseasesDB 14820 15393

WikiDoc Resources for Elevated transaminases

Articles

Most recent articles on Elevated transaminases

Most cited articles on Elevated transaminases

Review articles on Elevated transaminases

Articles on Elevated transaminases in N Eng J Med, Lancet, BMJ

Media

Powerpoint slides on Elevated transaminases

Images of Elevated transaminases

Photos of Elevated transaminases

Podcasts & MP3s on Elevated transaminases

Videos on Elevated transaminases

Evidence Based Medicine

Cochrane Collaboration on Elevated transaminases

Bandolier on Elevated transaminases

TRIP on Elevated transaminases

Clinical Trials

Ongoing Trials on Elevated transaminases at Clinical Trials.gov

Trial results on Elevated transaminases

Clinical Trials on Elevated transaminases at Google

Guidelines / Policies / Govt

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse on Elevated transaminases

NICE Guidance on Elevated transaminases

NHS PRODIGY Guidance

FDA on Elevated transaminases

CDC on Elevated transaminases

Books

Books on Elevated transaminases

News

Elevated transaminases in the news

Be alerted to news on Elevated transaminases

News trends on Elevated transaminases

Commentary

Blogs on Elevated transaminases

Definitions

Definitions of Elevated transaminases

Patient Resources / Community

Patient resources on Elevated transaminases

Discussion groups on Elevated transaminases

Patient Handouts on Elevated transaminases

Directions to Hospitals Treating Elevated transaminases

Risk calculators and risk factors for Elevated transaminases

Healthcare Provider Resources

Symptoms of Elevated transaminases

Causes & Risk Factors for Elevated transaminases

Diagnostic studies for Elevated transaminases

Treatment of Elevated transaminases

Continuing Medical Education (CME)

CME Programs on Elevated transaminases

International

Elevated transaminases en Espanol

Elevated transaminases en Francais

Business

Elevated transaminases in the Marketplace

Patents on Elevated transaminases

Experimental / Informatics

List of terms related to Elevated transaminases

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]

Overview

The presence of elevated transaminases can be an indicator of liver damage.

The biochemical hub of the body, the liver, has a variety of transaminases to synthesize and break down amino acids and to interconvert energy storage molecules. The concentrations of these in the serum (the non-cellular portion of blood) are normally low. However, if the liver is damaged, the hepatocyte cell membrane becomes more permeable and some of the enzymes leak out into the blood stream. The two transaminases commonly measured are alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST). These levels previously were called the serum glutamate-pyruvate transaminase (SGPT) and the serum glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT). Elevated levels are quite sensitive for liver injury, meaning that they are likely to be present if there is injury. However, they may also be elevated in other conditions. ALT is not commonly found outside the liver; AST too is most commonly found in the liver, but also in significant amounts in cardiac (heart) and skeletal muscle. In fact, measurement of these used to be part of diagnosing heart attacks, although newer enzymes and proteins that are more specific for cardiac damage have largely replaced this usage.

In general, any damage to the liver will cause medium elevations in these transaminases (usually called liver enzymes, though of course they are not the only enzymes in the liver). And diagnosis requires synthesis of many pieces of information, including the patient's history, physical examination, and possibly imaging or other laboratory examinations. However, very high elevations of the transaminases suggests severe liver damage, such as viral hepatitis, liver injury from lack of blood flow, or injury from drugs or toxins. Most disease processes cause ALT to rise higher than AST; AST levels double or triple that of ALT are consistent with alcoholic liver disease.

Drug Side Effect


Linked-in.jpg