Elastofibroma

Jump to: navigation, search

WikiDoc Resources for Elastofibroma

Articles

Most recent articles on Elastofibroma

Most cited articles on Elastofibroma

Review articles on Elastofibroma

Articles on Elastofibroma in N Eng J Med, Lancet, BMJ

Media

Powerpoint slides on Elastofibroma

Images of Elastofibroma

Photos of Elastofibroma

Podcasts & MP3s on Elastofibroma

Videos on Elastofibroma

Evidence Based Medicine

Cochrane Collaboration on Elastofibroma

Bandolier on Elastofibroma

TRIP on Elastofibroma

Clinical Trials

Ongoing Trials on Elastofibroma at Clinical Trials.gov

Trial results on Elastofibroma

Clinical Trials on Elastofibroma at Google

Guidelines / Policies / Govt

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse on Elastofibroma

NICE Guidance on Elastofibroma

NHS PRODIGY Guidance

FDA on Elastofibroma

CDC on Elastofibroma

Books

Books on Elastofibroma

News

Elastofibroma in the news

Be alerted to news on Elastofibroma

News trends on Elastofibroma

Commentary

Blogs on Elastofibroma

Definitions

Definitions of Elastofibroma

Patient Resources / Community

Patient resources on Elastofibroma

Discussion groups on Elastofibroma

Patient Handouts on Elastofibroma

Directions to Hospitals Treating Elastofibroma

Risk calculators and risk factors for Elastofibroma

Healthcare Provider Resources

Symptoms of Elastofibroma

Causes & Risk Factors for Elastofibroma

Diagnostic studies for Elastofibroma

Treatment of Elastofibroma

Continuing Medical Education (CME)

CME Programs on Elastofibroma

International

Elastofibroma en Espanol

Elastofibroma en Francais

Business

Elastofibroma in the Marketplace

Patents on Elastofibroma

Experimental / Informatics

List of terms related to Elastofibroma

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1] Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Ammu Susheela, M.D. [2]

Synonyms and Keywords: Elastofibroma dorsi

Overview

Elastofibroma is an ill-defined fibroelastic tumor-like condition made up of enlarged and irregular elastic fibers. On gross pathology, ill defined, nonencapsulated, rubbery, and firm, white lesion with interspersed fat are characteristic findings of elastofibroma. On microscopic histopathological analysis, heavy dense bands of collagenous tissue dissected by fat and abnormal elastic fibers are characteristic findings of elastofibroma . The elastic fibers are usually quite large and are easily identified. The elastic fibers are coarse, thick, and darkly eosinophilic, often fragmented into globules, creating a "string of pearls" or "pipe cleaner" appearance. Degeneration will cause the elastic fibers to appear as globules with a serrated or prickled edge. Elastofibroma may be caused by either trauma, genetic mutation, or systemic enzyme defects. Elastofibroma must be differentiated from other diseases that cause soft tissue tumor such as: spindle cell lipoma, nuchal-type fibroma, and fibromatosis colli. Elastofibroma may also be diagnosed using biopsy and histochemistry. Surgery is the mainstay of therapy for elastofibroma.

Pathophysiology

  • Elastofibroma, also called elastofibroma dorsi, is an ill-defined fibroelastic tumor-like condition made up of enlarged and irregular elastic fibers. [1] [2]
  • The tumor develops very specifically in the subscapular or infrascapular area, deep to the muscle, and can be attached to periosteum of ribs. It is usually between the shoulder blade and the lower neck, with rare tumors reported in the chest wall. [1] [3] [2]
  • The genetic mutation in has been associated alterations of short arm of chromosome 1 with the development of elastofibroma.
  • On gross pathology, ill defined, nonencapsulated, rubbery, and firm, white lesion with interspersed fat are characteristic findings of elastofibroma.
  • On microscopic histopathological analysis, heavy dense bands of collagenous tissue dissected by fat and abnormal elastic fibers are characteristic findings of elastofibroma. The elastic fibers are often quite large and are easily identified. The elastic fibers are coarse, thick, and darkly eosinophilic, often fragmented into globules, creating a "string of pearls" or "pipe cleaner" appearance. Degeneration will cause the elastic fibers to appear as globules with a serrated or prickled edge.

Causes

Differentiating Elastofibroma from other Diseases

  • Elastofibroma must be differentiated from other diseases that cause soft tissue tumor such as:
  • Spindle cell lipoma
  • Nuchal fibroma
  • Fibromatosis colli

Epidemiology and Demographics

  • Elastoblastoma is a very rare disease.

Age

  • Elastofibroma is more commonly observed among patients aged more than 50 years old.

Gender

  • Females are more commonly affected with elastofibroma than males.
  • The female to male ratio is approximately 5:1.

Race

  • Elastofibroma usually reported more in individuals of the Japanese race.

Risk Factors

  • Common risk factor in the development of elastofibroma is trauma.

Diagnosis

Symptoms

  • Symptoms of elastofibroma may include the following:
  • Swelling
  • Pain

Physical Examination

  • Patients with elastofibroma usually appear normal.
  • Physical examination may be remarkable for:
  • Slow growing, deep-seated, firm mass, often presenting bilaterally
  • Tenderness

Other Diagnostic Studies

  • Elastofibroma may also be diagnosed using biopsy and histochemistry.

Histochemistry

Treatment

Surgery

  • Surgery is the mainstay of therapy for elastofibroma.

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Chandrasekar, C. R.; Grimer, R. J.; Carter, S. R.; Tillman, R. M.; Abudu, A.; Davies, A. M.; Sumathi, V. P. (2008). "Elastofibroma Dorsi: An Uncommon Benign Pseudotumour". Sarcoma. 2008: 1. PMC 2276598Freely accessible. PMID 18382611. doi:10.1155/2008/756565. 
  2. 2.0 2.1 Briccoli, A.; Casadei, R.; Di Renzo, M.; Favale, L.; Bacchini, P.; Bertoni, F. (2000). "Elastofibroma dorsi". Surgery today. 30 (2): 147–152. PMID 10664338. doi:10.1007/pl00010063. 
  3. Mortman, K. D.; Hochheiser, G. M.; Giblin, E. M.; Manon-Matos, Y.; Frankel, K. M. (2007). "Elastofibroma Dorsi: Clinicopathologic Review of 6 Cases". The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. 83 (5): 1894–1897. PMID 17462431. doi:10.1016/j.athoracsur.2006.11.050. 
  4. Nakamura, Y.; Ohta, Y.; Itoh, S.; Haratake, A.; Nakano, Y.; Umeda, A.; Shima, H.; Tomoda, N. (1992). "Elastofibroma dorsi. Cytologic, histologic, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural studies". Acta cytologica. 36 (4): 559–562. PMID 1636353. 

Linked-in.jpg